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Top 10 tech mistakes you should never make

These are all good but seriously, you should have more than one email address.At least two, one for business and one for pleasure. - I have five because… sorry, I can’t even remember why. :\

The one tech mistake that isn’t included here but should is having multiple user accounts on your computer.

  • One “administrator" account (for installing programs, apps, and performing updates) and at least one "user" account with limited permissions for everyday use.
  • The idea is that, if you use your ‘limited permission’ user account for everyday web surfing and email you will be less likely to inadvertently install malware, spyware, or virus onto your computer.
  • In other words, if you click on a malicious link while logged on with a limited permission user account, a pop-up will appear asking for a password so it can install whatever it is you’ve ‘accidentally’ clicked. If you’re always logged in as administrator, the malicious software will automatically install without your knowledge.

This is why it’s important to always use a sign in password even if you live alone. It’s not about who has access to your computer in your home, it’s who has access to it from the internet.

Remember… No firewall and/or antivirus is 100% effective.

Philly vs. Comcast: Rally, Speak Out & Save the Internet!

Companies like Comcast are trying to seize control of the Internet. And they’re just about the only ones cheering FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s plan to allow discrimination online.

But here’s the thing: We refuse to let these companies have the last word.

On Sept. 15 we’re holding a big rally in Philadelphia to save Net Neutrality and stop the Comcast merger — and we want you to be part of it.

Help us take the fight to Comcast’s doorstep on Sept. 15. Together we can speak out and push the FCC to do the right thing.

RSVP today:

When: Mon., Sept. 15, from 12:30–1:30 p.m.
Where: Comcast Center, 1701 John F. Kennedy Blvd. (North 17th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard), Philadelphia
Bring: Plenty of energy and a big, bold sign with your message to the FCC

Fight back on Sept. 15. Sign up and help us stop Comcast.

Robotic printer paints portrait of artist in his own blood!

Artist Ted Lawson has created a robotic printer that uses his own blood as ink for a nude self-portrait.

by Michelle Starr via cnet

http://www.cnet.com/news/robotic-printer-paints-dot-matrix-portrait-of-artist-in-his-own-blood/

So… the next #Android is L

Seriously guys, #Android L?
No Lollipop
No Lemon Drop
Not even a Licorice?
Just… “L”
Someone’s been falling asleep at the wheel.

sesamestreet:

Question: Do you think kids today would realize that the brown thing in the background is a radio?
Answer: NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

sesamestreet:

Question: Do you think kids today would realize that the brown thing in the background is a radio?

Answer: NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]



But… but… but… jobs. Oil. pollution!

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

But… but… but… jobs. Oil. pollution!

The Biggest Problem With The Windows Store: Scams Everywhere
by Whitson Gordon on LifeHacker.com

Windows 8′s “Windows Store” is a great idea, but it’s a disaster. It’s full of scams, designed to trick you into buying apps you don’t need.
Our friends over at the How-To Geek recently wrote a great piece about the biggest problem with the Windows Store, and how Microsoft has apparently done nothing to address it (despite claiming they would over a year ago). For example, here’s what happens if you search for VLC, a popular free video player:

From the screenshot above, you’d be forgiven for thinking there are a lot of official VLC apps. There aren’t — many apps are just copying VLC’s trademark icon to make themselves look legitimate.
Luckily, VLC actually offers an official app for Windows 8, so “VLC for Windows 8″ is the first app in the list. In addition to various apps pretending to be VLC itself, there are paid apps offering a “VLC download.” These apps exist to trick you into buying them — after you do, they give you a link to download the free VLC application. Hopefully they will link you to the real one and not one filled with malware!
Included in the list is “VLC Player Download” for $US4.99. Its description says “this app helps the users to know how to download install and why it is.” If that’s too expensive for you, you can also get “Download Vlc Player” for $US1.99 or “download vlc media player” for $US1.29.
We aren’t digging deep into the Store looking for this stuff. It’s what pops up on the first page when we search for a popular app.

Of course, some of you more tech-savvy folks may be able to see through this charade, but it doesn’t make it any less annoying — and it’s a serious problem for those that may not be so savvy.
So what’s the solution? Unfortunately, there isn’t a great workaround here. But, here are a few things we recommend:
If you’re downloading a desktop app, you’re probably better off getting it from the developer’s web site than searching in the Windows Store.
If you’re downloading a “Modern UI” app, try checking the developer’s web site for a link — or even trusted software sites like Lifehacker, How-To Geek, and others. You can trust they will link you to the correct app in the store, no searching necessary.
If you must search the Windows Store, check the publisher of the app and make sure it matches the publisher of the app you want to download.
None of these are foolproof, and it’s absurd that Microsoft hasn’t fixed this problem — particularly when Apple and Google have shown that it’s easily doable. Hit the link below to read more.
The Windows Store is a Cesspool of Scams — Why Doesn’t Microsoft Care? [How-To Geek]
    ➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿
As a new Windows 8 owner, I can tell you that the Windows Store is crap!

The Biggest Problem With The Windows Store: Scams Everywhere

by

Windows 8′s “Windows Store” is a great idea, but it’s a disaster. It’s full of scams, designed to trick you into buying apps you don’t need.

Our friends over at the How-To Geek recently wrote a great piece about the biggest problem with the Windows Store, and how Microsoft has apparently done nothing to address it (despite claiming they would over a year ago). For example, here’s what happens if you search for VLC, a popular free video player:

From the screenshot above, you’d be forgiven for thinking there are a lot of official VLC apps. There aren’t — many apps are just copying VLC’s trademark icon to make themselves look legitimate.

Luckily, VLC actually offers an official app for Windows 8, so “VLC for Windows 8″ is the first app in the list. In addition to various apps pretending to be VLC itself, there are paid apps offering a “VLC download.” These apps exist to trick you into buying them — after you do, they give you a link to download the free VLC application. Hopefully they will link you to the real one and not one filled with malware!

Included in the list is “VLC Player Download” for $US4.99. Its description says “this app helps the users to know how to download install and why it is.” If that’s too expensive for you, you can also get “Download Vlc Player” for $US1.99 or “download vlc media player” for $US1.29.

We aren’t digging deep into the Store looking for this stuff. It’s what pops up on the first page when we search for a popular app.

Of course, some of you more tech-savvy folks may be able to see through this charade, but it doesn’t make it any less annoying — and it’s a serious problem for those that may not be so savvy.

So what’s the solution? Unfortunately, there isn’t a great workaround here. But, here are a few things we recommend:

  • If you’re downloading a desktop app, you’re probably better off getting it from the developer’s web site than searching in the Windows Store.
  • If you’re downloading a “Modern UI” app, try checking the developer’s web site for a link — or even trusted software sites like Lifehacker, How-To Geek, and others. You can trust they will link you to the correct app in the store, no searching necessary.
  • If you must search the Windows Store, check the publisher of the app and make sure it matches the publisher of the app you want to download.

None of these are foolproof, and it’s absurd that Microsoft hasn’t fixed this problem — particularly when Apple and Google have shown that it’s easily doable. Hit the link below to read more.

The Windows Store is a Cesspool of Scams — Why Doesn’t Microsoft Care? [How-To Geek]

    ➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿➿

As a new Windows 8 owner, I can tell you that the Windows Store is crap!

gaywrites:

"I Hit Send, or Modern Meltdown." Gorgeous (slightly NSFW) spoken word piece by gay college student Steven Boyle about his first crush post-coming-out. Swoon. (via the Huffington Post Gay Voices)