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iheartchaos:

Gamers play Tetris on a Philadelphia skyscraper, because why not?

This public gaming event, called Arcade @ The Oval, marked the start of Philly Tech Week (April 4 - 12, 2014)

joost5:

liberalsarecool:

Progressives want hi-speed rail in America. Conservatives veto all the projects. They want to preserve that 1950s way of life.

Follow the money. It’s those who benefit most from car culture, traffic and petroleum consumption that are winning the debate.

joost5:

liberalsarecool:

Progressives want hi-speed rail in America. Conservatives veto all the projects. They want to preserve that 1950s way of life.

Follow the money. It’s those who benefit most from car culture, traffic and petroleum consumption that are winning the debate.

6 tech gifts you shouldn’t buy this holiday season

by Kim Komando (USA TODAY)

The holidays are a great time to buy your family — or yourself — exciting new gadgets. Smartphones, tablets, TVs, headphones, computers, streaming media players, soundbars, gaming consoles, robots, cameras — the list seems endless.

Unfortunately, you should avoid some items on that list. These tech no-nos are either on the way out, or not quite ready for prime time. Here are gifts to avoid this holiday.

Sub-$400 Laptops

Looking for a bargain laptop to surf the Web, watch movies, listen to music, read books, play casual games and perform other light computing tasks? You’ll find plenty.

More people are finding that for the same money — or less — they can do just as much, or more, with a tablet. A tablet is ultraportable, has better battery life, is more versatile and less susceptible to malware than a laptop.

read more at USA TODAY

Time Machines: Say 01100011 01101000 01100101 01100101 01110011 01100101!
 BY Jon Turi 
Today the world can easily be captured in 1s and 0s for our viewing pleasure. The hardware behind this capability all started as a DIY lab project in 1974 to test out some new gear, and the result was a Frankenstein-like device that would eventually lead to world-changing advances in photographic technology.
First digital camera

The image showed a clear silhouette, but what should have been details was just a sea of static. The camera had worked, but it still had a ways to go. After some troubleshooting, however, Steve Sasson realized that the playback unit had just jumbled the bit order. Only the distinct 1s and 0s (black and white) had displayed correctly, leaving the remaining parts of the image a distorted mess. With an hour’s worth of tinkering, he managed to fix the output problem and was able to view the first successful digital photograph.

Sasson was an electrical engineer at Eastman Kodak in 1974 when he started working on his digital camera project. He was testing out a charge-coupled device (CCD) that had just been released that year and decided to build a camera to check its image quality. The unique thing was that it would be all-digital. It wouldn’t need any film, which was certainly an interesting development for a company that made its money selling film and photographic paper.
After about a year on the project, Sasson and his team managed to cobble together an 8.5-pound portable camera from spare parts. The lab team had scavenged bits and pieces from all around the company campus. They had snagged a lens from Kodak’s Super 8 camera, along with a mixture of parts including a portable digital cassette recorder, 16 nickel-cadmium batteries and several dozen digital and analog circuits all wired together across about six circuit boards. The CCD was a digital imaging chip, providing a matrix of light-sensing photosites (or pixels) and offered a 100 x 100 matrix array — which measures 0.01 megapixel by today’s standards. Light patterns would strike the sensor, which would convert them into electrical signals that could be converted into a digital image. It took a while, but Sasson and his team had finally brought his digital camera from concept to a rather unconventional-looking reality.

Until the first real-world test, their only interaction with the device had been through voltage measurements and oscilloscope traces. In December 1975, they headed down the hall to try their photographic skills out on a comely lab technician. With a little coaxing and a click of the shutter, they had captured the snapshot and returned to their lab to view the results. The CCD sent the image data over to a digital cassette recorder bolted onto the side of the camera, a process that took 23 seconds to complete. After a short wait, they ejected the tape, slotted it into their own custom-built playback unit and glanced over at the display to find that, with some fine-tuning, the experiment was a success.

Demonstration photo of the digital camera’s playback system using Kodak’s standard boy and dog test image.

Sasson shared his findings with various groups throughout the company over the course of 1976. His demo was titled: Film-less photography, which certainly raised a few eyebrows at the film-entrenched Eastman Kodak. His co-workers flooded him with questions, but they weren’t about the technology, rather, its implications. Many inquired about the potential impact this device would have on the market, while others asked why anyone would want to view photographs on a TV. Some were curious about what an “electronic photo album” would look like and how these digital images would be stored. Most importantly, they asked when it would be ready for consumer application.
He was hardly prepared to answer those questions; Sasson was an engineer, not a futurist, but he made his best guess based on Moore’s Law, suggesting it might be…
Read more at Engadget.com

Time Machines: Say 01100011 01101000 01100101 01100101 01110011 01100101!

Today the world can easily be captured in 1s and 0s for our viewing pleasure. The hardware behind this capability all started as a DIY lab project in 1974 to test out some new gear, and the result was a Frankenstein-like device that would eventually lead to world-changing advances in photographic technology.

First digital camera

The image showed a clear silhouette, but what should have been details was just a sea of static. The camera had worked, but it still had a ways to go. After some troubleshooting, however, Steve Sasson realized that the playback unit had just jumbled the bit order. Only the distinct 1s and 0s (black and white) had displayed correctly, leaving the remaining parts of the image a distorted mess. With an hour’s worth of tinkering, he managed to fix the output problem and was able to view the first successful digital photograph.

Sasson was an electrical engineer at Eastman Kodak in 1974 when he started working on his digital camera project. He was testing out a charge-coupled device (CCD) that had just been released that year and decided to build a camera to check its image quality. The unique thing was that it would be all-digital. It wouldn’t need any film, which was certainly an interesting development for a company that made its money selling film and photographic paper.

After about a year on the project, Sasson and his team managed to cobble together an 8.5-pound portable camera from spare parts. The lab team had scavenged bits and pieces from all around the company campus. They had snagged a lens from Kodak’s Super 8 camera, along with a mixture of parts including a portable digital cassette recorder, 16 nickel-cadmium batteries and several dozen digital and analog circuits all wired together across about six circuit boards. The CCD was a digital imaging chip, providing a matrix of light-sensing photosites (or pixels) and offered a 100 x 100 matrix array — which measures 0.01 megapixel by today’s standards. Light patterns would strike the sensor, which would convert them into electrical signals that could be converted into a digital image. It took a while, but Sasson and his team had finally brought his digital camera from concept to a rather unconventional-looking reality.

Until the first real-world test, their only interaction with the device had been through voltage measurements and oscilloscope traces. In December 1975, they headed down the hall to try their photographic skills out on a comely lab technician. With a little coaxing and a click of the shutter, they had captured the snapshot and returned to their lab to view the results. The CCD sent the image data over to a digital cassette recorder bolted onto the side of the camera, a process that took 23 seconds to complete. After a short wait, they ejected the tape, slotted it into their own custom-built playback unit and glanced over at the display to find that, with some fine-tuning, the experiment was a success.

Demonstration photo of the digital camera’s playback system using Kodak’s standard boy and dog test image.

Sasson shared his findings with various groups throughout the company over the course of 1976. His demo was titled: Film-less photography, which certainly raised a few eyebrows at the film-entrenched Eastman Kodak. His co-workers flooded him with questions, but they weren’t about the technology, rather, its implications. Many inquired about the potential impact this device would have on the market, while others asked why anyone would want to view photographs on a TV. Some were curious about what an “electronic photo album” would look like and how these digital images would be stored. Most importantly, they asked when it would be ready for consumer application.

He was hardly prepared to answer those questions; Sasson was an engineer, not a futurist, but he made his best guess based on Moore’s Law, suggesting it might be…

Read more at Engadget.com