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New Laptop: What to Do When You Get a New Notebook/Laptop/PC

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So, I got a new Windows 8 laptop and was trolling through YouTube for tips and tricks when I found this video.

The guy from Tek Syndicate  is friggin hysterical!! – and I mean that in a friendly way.– He holds your attention as he demonstrates how to clean all the bloatware from your computer.. Even if you’re not a techie you’ll find this humorous as well as educational.

BTW- He’s right about Norton anti-virus. Garbage.

  • Here’s something that EVERY computer user should be doing, create and use a separate local user account! Create a local user account that has limited permissions. Use that user account for your everyday activity. You can always log onto your administrator account to install software, tweak you’re settings, etc., otherwise leave it alone.  That way, nothing will be installed on your computer  should you ‘accidentally’ click a link with malicious software, spyware, etc. If you’re using a secondary user account with limited permissions, your computer will ask for an administrator password before installing anything.
  • To find out how to set up separate local user accounts, click here.

FYI- This post is for education and entertainment purposes only. If you are unfamiliar with the inner workings of your computer, you should leave it to a knowledgeable professional. Neither I nor Tek Syndicate can be held accountable for your computer.  In other words, you’re on your own.

Read more at ADignorantium.Wordpress

laughingsquid:

Digital Security Life Hacks to Protect Your Information

Also, use two different sign in accounts on your computer. 

  1. A password protected administrator account that you use only for updates and installations. Use this account only for important operating system adjustments, like removing or installing a web browser update.
  2. A user account that is also password protected, but does not have administrator privileges. Use this account for everyday web browsing, facebook, shopping, etc. That way, if a malicious website tries to install malware, spyware, or (gasp) a virus, your computer will ask permission to install the software. Seriously. Since this account doesn’t have administrator privileges, a pop-up window will appear asking for the administrator’s password.

Now you know. :)

TheyMightBeClippy: Electrical Etiquette?

theymightbeclippy:

Riddle me this….

Now that so many people have smart phones, I notice clusters of people hanging out around electrical outlets.  At the airport there are some “charging stations”, and people also plug into the electrical outlets (that are probably there so they can vacuum the floor).  In the library, some people plug phones into the computers via USB.  I’ve seen people plug in in bars as well.

  • Where is it OK to plug in?
  • Where is it Possibly OK?
  • Verboten?

If it’s a ‘Charging Station, that’s an invitation to plug in, right? But what about other places?  Can you just suck someone’s electricity In The Name of CONNECTIVITY?  Is it ‘wrong’ to stick your prongs into someone else’s receptacle without express permission?

(And when did the ‘shift key on the left side of my keyboard die?)

IMHO… Unless it’s a clearly marked “Charging Station”, or at a hotel, an airport or other transportation hub (a bus or train station) you should ask permission before plugging in.

If I’m at a bar or restaurant, I always ask first.

I’m also kinda obsessive about making sure I’m charged up before I go anywhere. But that’s just me.

Weird Science - Can Magnets Harm Computers?


National Geographic

Johnny Phillips investigates the myth that — if powerful enough — a magnet can race a laptop’s hard drive.