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profkew:

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.
New York’s ‘Night Of Birmingham Horror’ Sparked A Summer Of Riots

It was called “New York’s night of Birmingham horror.”
Just over two weeks after the landmark Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964, violence erupted in the streets of New York City, lasting a total of six nights. It was the first in a series of riots that would come to define the later years of the 1960s civil rights movement. The New York City riot of 1964 electrified the nation and led to splits within the movement’s leadership.
It began outside the walls of a Harlem police station, days after Lt. Thomas Gilligan, a white, off-duty police officer, shot and killed a 15-year-old African-American student named James Powell on July 16. Two days of peaceful protests ensued. But on the third day, a crowd surrounded the police precinct, calling for Gilligan’s arrest, and was met with swinging clubs of the New York Police Department, under a rainfall of glass bottles and garbage can lids thrown by residents from rooftops above. Gunfire broke out after police pushed thousands of demonstrators back a few blocks toward the corner of 125th Street and Lenox Avenue.
Read more here.

profkew:

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.

New York’s ‘Night Of Birmingham Horror’ Sparked A Summer Of Riots

It was called “New York’s night of Birmingham horror.”

Just over two weeks after the landmark Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964, violence erupted in the streets of New York City, lasting a total of six nights. It was the first in a series of riots that would come to define the later years of the 1960s civil rights movement. The New York City riot of 1964 electrified the nation and led to splits within the movement’s leadership.

It began outside the walls of a Harlem police station, days after Lt. Thomas Gilligan, a white, off-duty police officer, shot and killed a 15-year-old African-American student named James Powell on July 16. Two days of peaceful protests ensued. But on the third day, a crowd surrounded the police precinct, calling for Gilligan’s arrest, and was met with swinging clubs of the New York Police Department, under a rainfall of glass bottles and garbage can lids thrown by residents from rooftops above. Gunfire broke out after police pushed thousands of demonstrators back a few blocks toward the corner of 125th Street and Lenox Avenue.

Read more here.

derberlinernachbar:

Gay Freedom Day, San Francisco, CA, June 1976, photo by Harvey Milk
"Harvey Milk bought his 35mm Nikon range-finder - a Nippon Kogaku - while serving in the Navy. Very few images exist from this time period. It was not until his return to New York City that Harvey actively began his hobby as a recreational photographer. Gay Freedom Day was always an inspiring subject for Harvey Milk. There are many photographs in the archives of street “happenings" and public gatherings. The waiters at gay-friendly Momma Fortuna’s restaurant in the Haight would often dress in drag and travel in packs thrilling audiences at various public events with their bombastic style of flailing and vamping."
http://www.queer-arts.org/archive/9906/milk/milk.html

It’s important to acknowledge the critical role transgenders played in the advancement of American LGBT rights, particularly transgender people of color, who stood up to police at the Stonewall Inn one hot and humid June night in 1969.
Happy Pride Month Everybody!

derberlinernachbar:

Gay Freedom Day, San Francisco, CA, June 1976,
photo by Harvey Milk

"Harvey Milk bought his 35mm Nikon range-finder - a Nippon Kogaku - while serving in the Navy. Very few images exist from this time period. It was not until his return to New York City that Harvey actively began his hobby as a recreational photographer. Gay Freedom Day was always an inspiring subject for Harvey Milk. There are many photographs in the archives of street “happenings" and public gatherings. The waiters at gay-friendly Momma Fortuna’s restaurant in the Haight would often dress in drag and travel in packs thrilling audiences at various public events with their bombastic style of flailing and vamping."

http://www.queer-arts.org/archive/9906/milk/milk.html

It’s important to acknowledge the critical role transgenders played in the advancement of American LGBT rights, particularly transgender people of color, who stood up to police at the Stonewall Inn one hot and humid June night in 1969.

  • Happy Pride Month Everybody!

What About Protection For LGBT Families??

#MarriageEquality What About Protection For #LGBT Families?? We’ve come a long way, baby. #PrideMonth

*Note: this piece has been sitting in my drafts folder for almost a year. Since then the U.S. Supreme Court has deemed The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional and several more states have struck down their anti-same sex marriage laws. A lot has changed since I wrote it, but the sentiment remains. I’ve witnessed the damage that happens to gay couples because they didn’t have the legal protections afforded to their heterosexual counterparts. This isn’t about hurting straight couples. This is about protecting LGBT couples. Nothing more.

====================================

Anyone who has lived through the height of the AIDS crisis understands why Same Sex Marriage is necessary.

I’ve witnessed countless gay men lose everything as the families of their deceased partners swooped in like vultures, devouring everything in sight. It reminded me of the peasants picking through Scrooge’s things in the Dickens classic, A Christmas Carol. These family members weren’t close to the deceased. In most cases they had disowned their gay son. Some were so fearful of AIDS that they refused to come visit their son or brother in the hospital, leaving the survivor to care for his sick partner alone. — Strange. Where was their fear of HIV/AIDS when they were picking through the dead man’s belongings?

It pissed me off to no end seeing these cowards walk in after the fact and claim property simply because they were family. Where was their “Family Values” when their relative was sick??

One woman had the arrogance to tell a friend of mine that his 15 year relationship with her brother was nothing more than playing house. “My husband and I have been married for ten years,” she said. “You two may have lived together, but it was not love.” WHAT?? Was she out of her friggin mind??

One of my friends challenged his deceased partner’s family. The father, who was a lawyer, told his son’s partner, “I have infinite resources. You will go bankrupt if you try to challenge me.” My friend’s case never made it to court. He was forced to move less than a year later.

Those are just two examples of the complete disregard for and discrimination of LGBT families. Did you know it is legal to fire someone simply because he or she is Gay in 29 states? Twenty-Nine States! That’s the reason ENDA is so important. AND… Gays and Lesbians can be DENIED housing in another 29 states. What the hell!

“But what about the children?”

Yeah. Conservatives love to hold children hostage over every issue they don’t approve of. For some reason, they think legalizing Same-Sex Marriage will somehow interfere with the raising of their children. I don’t understand the resistance to educating children, in an age appropriate way, about the world around them. Besides, what of the Gay and Lesbian couples who are raising children? Where is the protection for their families?

If the foundation or your marriage so fragile that it would crumble under the weight of another couple’s happiness, I feel sorry for you.

Here’s the thing. Same Sex Marriage is a conservative idea. It’s personal liberty. It’s “Family Values”

Fifteen years ago, when the idea of Same-Sex Marriage was in it’s infancy, I may have settled for Civil Unions, but Civil Unions are NOT equal to Marriage. A Marriage grants you 1,138 federal rights, protections and responsibilities   A Civil Union does not.

Depending on which state you live, it will cost you between $50 and $100 for a Marriage license. In order to acquire some of (but not all) those rights an LGBT couple must hire a lawyer and spend hundreds, maybe thousands of dollars. Why do I need to make a lawyer rich just to enjoy the same rights as any two strangers can get just because they said, “I Do” at a Las Vegas Drive-Thru wedding chapel?

==================================

It heartens me to see that we have accomplished so much since I first drafted this post. At this moment nineteen states and the District of Columbia have given the ‘go ahead’ to same sex marriage. We still have a long way to go, but I cannot overlook the accomplishments of just this last year. LGBTs and their allies have much to be proud of.

Happy Pride Month Everybody!

View On ADignorantum.WordPress

James Baldwin Debates William F. Buckley (1965)

Historic debate between James Baldwin v. William F. Buckley Jr. at Cambridge University on the question: “Is the American Dream at the expense of the American Negro?” - The Riverbends Channel

James Baldwin was one of the most brilliant minds of our time. He was unapologetic about his blackness or his sexuality. Rightfully so, as there was nothing he could (or should) have done to change either.

I debated whether or not to tag this as a #ThrowBackThursday post. I didn’t want to trivialize the civil rights movement. The LGBT movement owes so much to these civil rights heroes.

Note: This video runs about an hour. It’s worth your attention, if for no other reason than to get a glimpse of American history through the eyes of non-US citizens. So if you don’t have the time to watch it now please bookmark it and save it for a future time when you can.

Thanks.

theblacksophisticate:

Happy birthday to the late Dr. Dorothy Height. What a trailblazer! What a legacy! Google's doodle is dedicated to her!





Dorothy Irene Height was an American administrator, educator, and a civil rights and women’s rights activist specifically focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness. (via Wikipedia)

theblacksophisticate:

Happy birthday to the late Dr. Dorothy Height. What a trailblazer! What a legacy! Google's doodle is dedicated to her!

  • Dorothy Irene Height was an American administrator, educator, and a civil rights and women’s rights activist specifically focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness. (via Wikipedia)

fyeah-history:

Photographs from the White Night riots
The White Night riots were a series of violent events sparked by an announcement of the lenient sentencing of Dan White, for the assassinations of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk. The events took place on the night of May 21, 1979 (the night before what would have been Milk’s 49th birthday) in San Francisco. Earlier that day, White had been convicted of voluntary manslaughter, the lightest possible conviction for his actions.

The gay community of San Francisco had a longstanding conflict with the San Francisco Police Department. White’s status as a former police officer intensified the community’s anger at the SFPD. Initial demonstrations took place as a peaceful march through the Castro district of San Francisco. After the crowd arrived at the San Francisco City Hall, violence began. The events caused hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of property damage to City Hall and the surrounding area, as well as injuries to police officers and rioters.

Several hours after the riot had been broken up, police made a retaliatory raid on a gay bar in San Francisco’s Castro District. Many patrons were beaten by police in riot gear. Two dozen arrests were made during the course of the raid, and several people later sued the SFPD.

In the following days, gay leaders refused to apologize for the events of that night. This led to increased political power in the gay community, which culminated in the election of Mayor Dianne Feinstein to a full term, the following November. In response to a campaign promise, Feinstein appointed a pro-gay Chief of Police, which increased recruitment of gay people in the police force and eased tensions.

(Source: Wikipedia)

unhistorical:

May 21, 1979: The White Night riots begin.

On November 27, 1978, Harvey Milk - San Francisco’s first and one of the country’s first openly gay elected officials - was shot and killed by San Francisco supervisor Dan White (also killed in the attack was Mayor George Moscone). White and Milk had served together (and often clashed on issues while serving together) on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors under Dianne Feinstein for around ten months before White, citing his disgust at the corruption of city politics and his need for a higher salary, resigned his position as supervisor. After Moscone declined his request for re-appointment to his position at Milk’s (and others’) urging, White assassinated both men at San Francisco City Hall. 

White’s trial officially began on May 1, 1979. The jury announced its verdict three weeks later after 36 hours of deliberation  White was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter and was sentenced to seven years in prison; his defense team had successfully argued that, because of White’s spiral into depression (as evidenced by his change in diet from healthy foods to junk food), he would have been unable to premeditate murder, therefore making it impossible for him to be charged with first degree murder. Instead, White’s assassination of Milk and Mayor Moscone was defined as third degree murder, a “heat of passion” crime, and the least severe conviction White could have managed to leave the courtroom with, despite the fact that White had admitted to planning the assassinations of Carol Ruth Silver and Willie Brown. 

The “White Night riots” began in the Castro District (where Harvey Milk began his work as a gay rights activist) as a gathering of several hundred people, mostly members of the Castro’s LGBT community. Enraged over White’s light sentence, thousands of protesters erupted into violence, and riots broke out near City Hall. By the end of the incident, during which policemen indiscriminately attacked rioters and vice versa, sixty-one policemen and around 100 protesters were hospitalized. Throughout the 1960s and 70s, tensions between San Francisco’s conservative elements and its growing minority populations increased as the latter groups gained political and economic influence - this hostile divide was apparent within the Board of Supervisors, in the conflict between White (who was relatively conservative) and Milk, and in the White Night riots, which pitted the city’s police department, which had raised money for White’s defense, against the city’s gay community, which had been revitalized under Milk’s leadership and by his election.

In 1985, Dan White committed suicide. Harvey Milk was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. 

A Word About Allies.

A Word About Allies.

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, I thought I’d say a few words about allies.

According to Dictionary.com, an Ally isa person who associates or cooperates with another; a supporter.”

I can only speak from my own life experience. I am a gay, while male. That is the perspective from which I see the world. When it comes to *people of color, the best I can do is empathize and remember that it’s not always about me.

❇When I say “People of Color”, I’m referring to all ethnic and/or non-white people. Essentially, the majority of people on the planet.

As a gay man, I can easily empathize with any oppressed persons. There are laws prohibiting my very existence. Anti-gay violence is everywhere. It would be easy to compare it to the horrors inflicted upon African American families throughout the history of this great, yet flawed, country of ours. But I have the luxury of never having had my family torn apart and sold as chattel. No one in my family ever risked their lives just to sit at a lunch counter. No one in my family was strung up in a tree and left to die because (s)he misspoke. None of my family was burned out of their home because they moved into a neighborhood with better schools.

Allies don’t always get it right.

The job of an ally is to support and give voice to those whose voice cannot be heard. Unfortunately, we sometimes get so caught up in our own BS that we forget to step aside and give up the spotlight.

I’ve been fortunate to have had good friends and lovers who have had the patience and fortitude to put up with my BS, and show me when and where I was wrong. I didn’t always like it. At times I was downright insulted. How dare they say I’m just as racist as…? Live and learn, right?

The point I’m trying to make is this.

When you hear black folks expressing displeasure about white folks, for any reason, remember it’s necessarily about you. It could be, but chances are they’re just trying to tell you something. All you have to do is shut up and listen.

It’s not your job to say anything. Just listen.

view source

Explosion At Fukushima Reactor! 12/28/13 Radioactive Steam Billowing Out Into The Atmosphere! – 30 December 2013

Uploaded on 29 December 2013 by ShantiUniverse

TEPCO just released on December 28th 2013 that an explosion at the Fukushima Reactor #3 building has taken place and 89 TONS of radioactive material may be releasing into our atmosphere being carried by steam!

Article links: http://www.turnerradionetwork.com/new…

BPEarthwatch BlogTalkRadio: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/bpearthw…

LIVE Show Monday December 30,2013 @ 2:30pm CT

A Can’t miss Event with BPEarthwatch talking about this disaster and how to prepare if needed!

source

I’m posting this for a number of reasons, the first being that we would be foolish to think Fukushima an isolated event that is over and done with. The reactors continually emit radioactive material into the environment. The effects will be felt for decades, if not centuries, to come. This should concern us all, not just those living on the West Coast of the United States. Radiation is getting into our food supply. King crabs and salmon from Alaska and produce and wine from California and Washington are just a few affected foodstuffs.

It’s not just Fukushima. The effects of the BP oil spill are still unknown. Fracking is leaking harmful chemicals and gasses, including methane, into our drinking water 

But no one is paying attention.

I could point fingers at the tea party GOP for their animus towards the EPA, FDA, and other consumer health and safety organizations, but that wouldn’t solve anything.

All we need are people who care enough to make some noise.

If we don’t stand up for our environment, then unemployment, civil rights, marriage equality, and the economy mean nothing. Without safe drinking water and food, we won’t last long enough to worry about voter suppression.

Cause and effect. Everything goes somewhere.

San Antonio Passes Far-Reaching Antidiscrimination Measure

(photo: Eric Gay/Associated Press)
Tiffani Bishop, left, Lauryn Farris, right, and Jennifer Falcon after the San Antonio officials passed the ordinance on Thursday.
By  MANNY FERNANDEZ

HOUSTON — Nearly 200 cities across the country have enacted ordinances in recent years that prohibit bias by municipal employees or in city contracts over someone’s race, sex, age, religion or sexual orientation. Houston, Austin, Dallas and Fort Worth are a few of the Texas cities that adopted such measures.
But in San Antonio, a nondiscrimination ordinance that includes protections for sexual orientation and gender identity turned into a divisive political battle this summer, the likes of which this liberal-leaning city of 1.4 million has rarely seen in recent decades.
The City Council passed the measure, 8 to 3, on Thursday, capping weeks of heated debate that exposed racial, religious and gay-and-straight divisions and drew the scorn of Republican leaders and candidates around the state who are just starting to position themselves for next spring’s primary elections.
The Texas attorney general, Greg Abbott, who has been running for governor since Gov. Rick Perry announced he was not seeking re-election, weighed in on the issue, expressing his opposition. The state agriculture commissioner, Todd Staples, who is running for lieutenant governor — and who as a state senator sponsored the constitutional amendment that passed in 2005 that defined marriage in Texas as between one man and one woman — also spoke out against it.
They said it would trample religious liberties by suppressing the views of those who oppose homosexuality or same-sex marriage for religious reasons, a claim supporters of the measure deny.
“I consider this an attempt to impose a liberal value system over the objection of millions of Texans,” Mr. Staples said. “It actually discriminates against those with deeply held religious views by pushing this agenda to the extreme.”
read more at nytimes.com

San Antonio Passes Far-Reaching Antidiscrimination Measure


(photo: Eric Gay/Associated Press)

Tiffani Bishop, left, Lauryn Farris, right, and Jennifer Falcon after the San Antonio officials passed the ordinance on Thursday.

But in San Antonio, a nondiscrimination ordinance that includes protections for sexual orientation and gender identity turned into a divisive political battle this summer, the likes of which this liberal-leaning city of 1.4 million has rarely seen in recent decades.

The City Council passed the measure, 8 to 3, on Thursday, capping weeks of heated debate that exposed racial, religious and gay-and-straight divisions and drew the scorn of Republican leaders and candidates around the state who are just starting to position themselves for next spring’s primary elections.

The Texas attorney general, Greg Abbott, who has been running for governor since Gov. Rick Perry announced he was not seeking re-election, weighed in on the issue, expressing his opposition. The state agriculture commissioner, Todd Staples, who is running for lieutenant governor — and who as a state senator sponsored the constitutional amendment that passed in 2005 that defined marriage in Texas as between one man and one woman — also spoke out against it.

They said it would trample religious liberties by suppressing the views of those who oppose homosexuality or same-sex marriage for religious reasons, a claim supporters of the measure deny.

“I consider this an attempt to impose a liberal value system over the objection of millions of Texans,” Mr. Staples said. “It actually discriminates against those with deeply held religious views by pushing this agenda to the extreme.”

read more at nytimes.com

Scott Lively will be tried for exporting homophobia to Uganda

gaywrites:

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that Scott Lively, an American evangelist, will be tried in an international lawsuit for helping conservative groups in Uganda target LGBT people. 

This will be the first persecution of its kind, holding Lively accountable for working with religious and governmental leaders to advise on the nation’s notoriously anti-gay laws. Lively has also carried out such work throughout Russia, and in this case he’s being tried for human rights violations.

During opening arguments in January, the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights said Lively’s decade-long collaboration with political and religious leaders in Uganda deprived the nation’s LGBT people of basic human rights and should therefore be punishable under the Alien Tort Statute, which gives "survivors of egregious human rights abuses, wherever committed, the right to sue the perpetrators in the United States," according to the Center for Justice and Accountability

Although federal judge Michael Ponsor initially expressed doubt that Lively’s actions constituted international human rights violations, statements the judge made in court Wednesday seemed to indicate a shift in tone. 

Of course, Lively argues that his actions were protected by his free speech rights, but we’ll see how far that gets him. This is one to watch.