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"I AM DIVINE" (trailer)

The 2013 documentary explores the life and fame of Divine, aka Harris Glenn Milstead, from humble beginnings as an overweight, teased Baltimore youth to internationally recognized drag icon.

Divine was one of a kind, the ultimate outsider turned underground royalty with a completely unapologetic, in-your-face style. He spit in the face of the status quo of body image, gender identity, sexuality, and preconceived notions of beauty, Divine blurred the line between performer and personality. He and John Waters revolutionized pop culture.

I Am Divine is a definitive biographical portrait that charts the legendary icon’s emotional complexities and rise to infamy.

AND… it’s available on Netflix streaming. :)

claudiaboleyn:

Cishets take note. 
This is victim blaming and not how you should ever speak to my community. 
This sort of speech puts the blame for LGBTQIAP+phobia on our community for simply being out. 
A basic translation is: 
We will only treat you as human if you pretend to be straight. 
If you don’t think our community has tried everything to stop the hatred and abuse against us then you need to think harder. 
The reason we still face this unacceptable bigotry is not because we refuse to be ashamed of our identities, it’s because of bigots like the tweeter above. 
Cis straight people have the privilege of being able to ‘flaunt’ their identities (aka live their lives without fear of hatred and harm on the basis of that identity) every single day. 
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people fear holding the hand of their significant other in public.
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people are denied the right to marry. 
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about friends and members of my community being made homeless by their bigoted cis heterosexual parents. 
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about members of my community being bullied, beaten, and even killed, for simply being who they are.
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people stop calling my sexuality a ‘disease’ I need to be cured of. 
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people, as a collective, can get their shit together and learn to treat me and my community like human beings. 
Cis straight people made my sexuality relevant the moment they started denying me rights and discriminating against me and my community on the basis of it. 

"I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about members of my community being bullied, beaten, and even killed, for simply being who they are.”
I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about Trans Women of Color being targeted for hate and murdered in the streets.

claudiaboleyn:

Cishets take note. 

This is victim blaming and not how you should ever speak to my community. 

This sort of speech puts the blame for LGBTQIAP+phobia on our community for simply being out. 

A basic translation is: 

We will only treat you as human if you pretend to be straight. 

If you don’t think our community has tried everything to stop the hatred and abuse against us then you need to think harder. 

The reason we still face this unacceptable bigotry is not because we refuse to be ashamed of our identities, it’s because of bigots like the tweeter above. 

Cis straight people have the privilege of being able to ‘flaunt’ their identities (aka live their lives without fear of hatred and harm on the basis of that identity) every single day. 

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people fear holding the hand of their significant other in public.

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people are denied the right to marry. 

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about friends and members of my community being made homeless by their bigoted cis heterosexual parents. 

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about members of my community being bullied, beaten, and even killed, for simply being who they are.

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people stop calling my sexuality a ‘disease’ I need to be cured of. 

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment cis straight people, as a collective, can get their shit together and learn to treat me and my community like human beings. 

Cis straight people made my sexuality relevant the moment they started denying me rights and discriminating against me and my community on the basis of it. 

"I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about members of my community being bullied, beaten, and even killed, for simply being who they are.”

I’ll stop making my sexuality relevant the moment I stop hearing about Trans Women of Color being targeted for hate and murdered in the streets.

Anonymous asked
Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quite being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

I never understood why it’s so difficult for people to treat others with the respect that they insist for themselves.

What do you care that Robert is now Roberta and wishes to be addressed in a feminine pronoun? How does that negatively affect you? What. The. Hell. Difference. To. Your. Life. Does. It. Make?

fadedwindsxo:

This is really important. 

#WeAreYou

"We believe that our humanity defines us, not who we love, or what gender we are. We believe that the United States has a duty to uphold the words in the Declaration of Independence - "We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal…", but it’s not doing that.

iO Tillett Wright is traveling the country, photographing 10,000 people who identify as ANYWHERE on the LGBTQ spectrum (even 1% gay is enough to get you fired in 29 States). When she has 10,000 portraits, she and her team will take them to the National Mall, in front of the Washington Monument, and stage a march on Washington. This is the SELF EVIDENT TRUTHS Project.

In response to the avalanche of bigotry and misinformation about LGBTQ people, the Self Evident team created the WE ARE YOU campaign - a simple message of love and support. Wear the shirt, put up the sticker, wear the bag, HASHTAG #WEAREYOU, and let it be known that you demand that all humans be treated equally.

GET INVOLVED TODAY AT: WWW.SELFEVIDENTPROJECT.COM

BUY THE SHIRT HERE - selfevidentproject.com/store/

msnbc:

Pride parades bring rainbows and rights to cities across country

Millions of people took to the streets across the country this weekend to champion gay rights, culture, and creative costumes celebrating all of the above.

This year’s attendees have a lot to celebrate: this year has seen judge after judge strike down gay marriage bans in states like Arkansas, Indiana, Utah, and Idaho, giving momentum to the movement and enabling the unions of thousands across the country.

The parades are scheduled annually to mark the anniversary of the Stonewall riots; this year is the 45th year since patrons of the Stonewall Inn bar violently protested the regular raids that shut down gay bars and arrested patrons. Those protests are largely seen as the mother of the modern gay rights movement.

Here are snapshots from three of the largest parades, in San Francisco, New York, and Chicago: http://on.msnbc.com/1voiYgF

Pay It No Mind: Marsha P. Johnson

This feature-length documentary focuses on revolutionary trans-activist, Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson, a Stonewall instigator, Andy Warhol model, drag queen, sex worker, starving actress, and Saint. “Pay It” captures the legendary gay/human rights activist as she recounts her life at the forefront of The Stonewall Riots in the 1960s, the creation of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) with Sylvia Rivera in the ’70s, and a New York City activist throughout the ’80s and early ’90s. Through her own words, as well as interviews with gay activist/reporter Randy Wicker, former Cockettes performer Agosto Machado, author Michael Musto, Hot Peaches founder/performer, Jimmy Camicia, and Stonewall activists Bob Kohler, Danny Garvin, Tommy Lanigan-Schmidt, and Martin Boyce, Marsha’s story lives on.

This documentary screened in 2012 at the IFC theater in New York, the British Film Institute in London, and La Mutinerie in Paris France.

I met Marsha Johnson in 1985 while visiting New York’s Gay Pride Parade with my first boyfriend. I was just twenty years old, it was my very first Pride celebration, and needless to say, Marsha made an huge impression on me.

I didn’t really know Marsha all that well, but feel fortunate that she and I chanced meeting twice again before she mysteriously died. Her joy for life was contagious.

I believe that people like Marsha, these innocents if you will, are put here to make the world a better place.

Happy Pride Month Everybody!

as posted on ADignorantium.WordPress

outrising:

louisvilleprideproject:

A few more to share!

Atheist Group Connects With LGBT Community In a Creative, Beautiful Way

An Atheist group has found a novel way to connect with the LGBT community as a way to promote humanism.

The Louisville Atheists and Freethinkers asked attendees at this week’s Kentuckiana Pride festival one simple question: what makes you proud? Participants were asked to write their answers on small post-it notes, which were then hung as a colourful mobile display for all to enjoy… Read more.

derberlinernachbar:

Gay Freedom Day, San Francisco, CA, June 1976, photo by Harvey Milk
"Harvey Milk bought his 35mm Nikon range-finder - a Nippon Kogaku - while serving in the Navy. Very few images exist from this time period. It was not until his return to New York City that Harvey actively began his hobby as a recreational photographer. Gay Freedom Day was always an inspiring subject for Harvey Milk. There are many photographs in the archives of street “happenings" and public gatherings. The waiters at gay-friendly Momma Fortuna’s restaurant in the Haight would often dress in drag and travel in packs thrilling audiences at various public events with their bombastic style of flailing and vamping."
http://www.queer-arts.org/archive/9906/milk/milk.html

It’s important to acknowledge the critical role transgenders played in the advancement of American LGBT rights, particularly transgender people of color, who stood up to police at the Stonewall Inn one hot and humid June night in 1969.
Happy Pride Month Everybody!

derberlinernachbar:

Gay Freedom Day, San Francisco, CA, June 1976,
photo by Harvey Milk

"Harvey Milk bought his 35mm Nikon range-finder - a Nippon Kogaku - while serving in the Navy. Very few images exist from this time period. It was not until his return to New York City that Harvey actively began his hobby as a recreational photographer. Gay Freedom Day was always an inspiring subject for Harvey Milk. There are many photographs in the archives of street “happenings" and public gatherings. The waiters at gay-friendly Momma Fortuna’s restaurant in the Haight would often dress in drag and travel in packs thrilling audiences at various public events with their bombastic style of flailing and vamping."

http://www.queer-arts.org/archive/9906/milk/milk.html

It’s important to acknowledge the critical role transgenders played in the advancement of American LGBT rights, particularly transgender people of color, who stood up to police at the Stonewall Inn one hot and humid June night in 1969.

  • Happy Pride Month Everybody!

Painting The Town Rainbow On Behalf Of LGBT Youth

You guys have no idea how happy this makes me.

It’s important to look out for LGBT youth. Things have gotten so much better since we came out, but we’ve got to remember that it’s still a very difficult process for any young LGBTQIA.

It’s important that there be safe places for LGBTQIA kids to exist without pressure from anyone. A true mentor is there for guidance but lets their charge become their own person.

I’ve mentioned before that the very first lgbt person I met in the city after coming out was transgender. She took me under her wing, acting as a parental figure, to protect my 17 year old self from the dangers that I was too young to see. It’s important for people to remember that the majority of those who stood up against the police raid at Stonewall were people like her, trans people of color. The Trans-right movement is long overdue.

I wish my friend T was still alive to see how far we’ve come.

(Source: projectqueer)