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austpicious:

God help me, my house is full of homo devil machines!

I keep seeing this photo circulating around the interwebs. It bothered me that there was no information identifying it’s source. So I did a Google image search for the image to find out what, if any, protest this is associated with.
When you look at the full image, as posted on WeWasteTime you’ll notice that she’s carrying a rainbow flag. So I had to wonder from where this image originates and why, if she’s holding a homophobic sign, she is carrying a gay pride flag. (Look closely. They’re ALL carrying rainbow flags.)

The very first link takes you to an online video game “Destroy The Computer” (by KibaGames) in which you throw punches at, you guessed it, a desktop computer. But it doesn’t explain the anti-gay signage. It would be a stretch to assume punching the computer symbolizes a hate crime in some way. — Though I’ve certainly hated my computer at times, I don’t believe my PC represents ALL computers. That would be OSist.
The earliest posting of the image I could find was May 2006 on Barking-Moonbat.com. A watermark on that image led me to StrangePolice.com and that’s where the trail ends.
The fact that there are more than one person in the photo, and that they are closely grouped together, leads me to believe this is a staged photo.
Why anyone would stage such a photo is anyone’s guess. Part of me suspects it’s a promotional stunt to raise LGBT awareness. Not many people know who Alan Turing is, or that the process by which he cracked the German Enigma code led to the modern day computer. Many more are unaware that Turing was a homosexual.
This simple image has been spreading LGBT awareness around the interwebs in it’s own little way for over seven years. None of the feedback that I’ve seen has been homophobic. That’s pretty amazing.
As posted on ADignorantium.WordPress

austpicious:

God help me, my house is full of homo devil machines!

I keep seeing this photo circulating around the interwebs. It bothered me that there was no information identifying it’s source. So I did a Google image search for the image to find out what, if any, protest this is associated with.

When you look at the full image, as posted on WeWasteTime you’ll notice that she’s carrying a rainbow flag. So I had to wonder from where this image originates and why, if she’s holding a homophobic sign, she is carrying a gay pride flag. (Look closely. They’re ALL carrying rainbow flags.)

The very first link takes you to an online video game “Destroy The Computer” (by KibaGames) in which you throw punches at, you guessed it, a desktop computer. But it doesn’t explain the anti-gay signage. It would be a stretch to assume punching the computer symbolizes a hate crime in some way. — Though I’ve certainly hated my computer at times, I don’t believe my PC represents ALL computers. That would be OSist.

The earliest posting of the image I could find was May 2006 on Barking-Moonbat.com. A watermark on that image led me to StrangePolice.com and that’s where the trail ends.

The fact that there are more than one person in the photo, and that they are closely grouped together, leads me to believe this is a staged photo.

Why anyone would stage such a photo is anyone’s guess. Part of me suspects it’s a promotional stunt to raise LGBT awareness. Not many people know who Alan Turing is, or that the process by which he cracked the German Enigma code led to the modern day computer. Many more are unaware that Turing was a homosexual.

This simple image has been spreading LGBT awareness around the interwebs in it’s own little way for over seven years. None of the feedback that I’ve seen has been homophobic. That’s pretty amazing.

As posted on ADignorantium.WordPress

When you see a post that reads, “Reblog if…”

And you say, “No! You’re not the boss of me.”
So you scroll past it on principle.

…even though you really want to reblog the post, which you identify with completely. :-\

no: ethiopienne: to the black kids who are nerdyto the black kids who are...

ethiopienne:

  • to the black kids who are nerdy
  • to the black kids who are sensitive
  • to the black kids who are queer
  • to the black kids who are immigrants
  • to the black kids who are femmes
  • to the black kids who are closeted
  • to the black kids who are shy
  • to the black kids who are awkward
  • to the black kids who are non-binary
  • to the black kids who are poor
  • to the black kids who are in foster care
  • to the black kids who are undocumented
  • to the black kids who are raising families
  • to the black kids who are fat
  • to the black kids who are addicts
  • to the black kids who are struggling with disordered eating
  • to the black kids who are mentally ill
  • to the black kids who are mixed race
  • to the black kids who are survivors
  • to the black kids who are in any way unsure of themselves

you are transcendent

you are worthy of love and recognition

you are appreciated

you are whole

(Source: ethiopienne)

Bayard Rustin honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

gaywrites:

Bayard Rustin, who was an openly gay advisor to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was announced as a posthumous recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom last week. Also announced as a recipient was the late Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, who was also openly gay.

Bayard Rustin, the openly gay right-hand man to the legendary Dr. King, has been called the “lost prophet” of the Civil Rights Movement. The late Rustin organized demonstrations, rallied activists, and lobbied politicians to help make life better for people of color. He was a key organizer in the historic March on Washington in 1963, where Dr. King delivered his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. Rustin died in 1987.

Rustin will be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the highest civilian honor available — as the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington nears, notes the Human Rights Campaign, which lobbied for Rustin’s inclusion. 

Like Harvey Milk and so many others, Bayard Rustin is one of those people we should be teaching our kids about during civil rights history lessons in schools. Here’s hoping this is the start of some well-deserved recognition across the board. 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 28, 1969: Police Raid the Stonewall Inn
In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. That night, the street erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations that lasted for the next three days.
The Stonewall riots, as they came to be known, marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.
In 2011, American Experience released the film “The Stonewall Uprising.”
Today, on the 44th anniversary, we invite you to:    •    Explore the milestones in the American Gay Rights Movement    •    View photos of the Stonewall Uprising    •    Watch the full film The Stonewall Uprising (Run time: 01:22:03)

Though the Stonewall Riots were pivotal to the advancement of the LGBT movement, I’d like to also acknowledge The Daughters of Bilitis and The Mattachine Society for their hard work and struggle.
Did you know The Daughters of Bilitis is on facebook?

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 28, 1969: Police Raid the Stonewall Inn

In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. That night, the street erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations that lasted for the next three days.

The Stonewall riots, as they came to be known, marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.

In 2011, American Experience released the film “The Stonewall Uprising.”

Today, on the 44th anniversary, we invite you to:
    •    Explore the milestones in the American Gay Rights Movement
    •    View photos of the Stonewall Uprising
    •    Watch the full film The Stonewall Uprising (Run time: 01:22:03)

Though the Stonewall Riots were pivotal to the advancement of the LGBT movement, I’d like to also acknowledge The Daughters of Bilitis and The Mattachine Society for their hard work and struggle.

Did you know The Daughters of Bilitis is on facebook?

We had an honorary category for men who’d been particularly helpful to DOB and they would be called Sons of Bilitis, S.O.Bs and this was a very nice little touch.

Barbara Gittings from the movie Pride Divide (via princeofprance)

The Upstairs Lounge Fire: The Little Known Story of the Largest Killing of Gays in US History

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Courtesy of Johnny Townsend

The Upstairs Lounge in the New Orleans French Quarter was a safe haven for gays in 1973. Every Sunday night from 5pm to 7pm, the second-floor bar held its weekly “beer bust”—all you can drink drafts for $1. It was a refuge where patrons could laugh, love, and even worship without fear. The Metropolitan Community Church, the only denomination at the time that welcomed gays and lesbians, often held services in the bar’s back-room theater.

On June 24, 1973, a flash fire tore through a gay bar in New Orleans’ French Quarter. In less than 20 minutes, 32 people were killed, dozens more critically injured and the ones who managed to escape watched helplessly as friends and lovers burned to death before their eyes. It is believed to be the largest killing of gay people in U.S. history. Yet politicians and religious leaders were relatively silent. The powerful Catholic Archbishop of New Orleans at the time, Phillip Hannan, did not offer his support or sympathy to victims. And while all signs pointed to arson, the police investigation ran cold. No one has ever been prosecuted.

In this week’s magazine, TIME tells the story of the Upstairs Lounge Fire, which remains little known and even less understood despite the epic scale of the tragedy. Events like Stonewall have entered the canon of GLBT history, while other, equally significant moments have lingered in the background. But the movement is still relatively young in the arc of American history and as Harvey Milk once said, “A reading of the Declaration of Independence on the steps of a building is widely covered. The events that started the American Revolution were the meetings in homes, pubs, on street corners.”

As the stories of a survivor who remembers that tragic night, the founder of the church whose local congregation held services in the bar and the lead police investigator on the case show, the Upstairs fire was one such event.

Forty years later, the Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans apologized for its silence in a statement to TIME: “In retrospect, if we did not release a statement we should have to be in solidarity with the victims and their families,” Archbishop Gregory Aymond said via email on June 17. “The church does not condone violence and hatred. If we did not extend our care and condolences, I deeply apologize.” In a month that anticipates a potentially landmark Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage, the apology is another sign that times are changing.