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Melissa Harris-Perry Delivers Powerful Tribute to Unarmed Black Men Killed By Police

  • Note: Melissa mentions Supreme Court Justice Roger B. Taney, the man for whom Philadelphia’s Little League phenoms the Taney Dragons are named. Justice Taney is most famous for the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision, which is considered to have indirectly been a cause of the Civil War. He said in part, …when the Constitution of the United States was framed and adopted… They (African descendants) had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far unfit that they (black men) had no rights which the white man was bound to respect.”

I bring up the Taney Dragons for two reasons…

  1. Mo’Ne Davis, a young black girl on a team largely populated by black children, is a superior athlete who deserves commands respect.
  2. Maybe it’s time for the Taney Dragons to change their name.

Javon Johnson - “cuz he’s black” (NPS 2013)

"It’s not about whether or not the shooter is racist. It’s about how poor black boys are treated as problems well before we are treated as people."

I’ve seen the GIF set of this video floating around and thought maybe folks should see the entire video.

  • As a side note, white privilege allows me to turn off my TV or log off of social media whenever this stuff gets too real for me to handle, but the people of Ferguson can’t change the channel. The people in North Philly can’t just turn it off. These are real people’s lives, people that matter. Remember that the next time you get the urge to log off Tumblr because the “unpleasantness” of the world is getting a little “too real”. - Frank D (aka adignorantium)

Special thanks to talldarklefty for the link to this video.

ricflairsniece:

smidgetz:

questionall:

Ferguson Man Forms an Inspiring Team with Cop Watchers to Hold Police Accountable [Video: http://bit.ly/1l8QoAA]

This is great.

Very good

This is the definition of ‘community’.

ricflairsniece:

smidgetz:

questionall:

Ferguson Man Forms an Inspiring Team with Cop Watchers to Hold Police Accountable [Video: http://bit.ly/1l8QoAA]

This is great.

Very good

This is the definition of ‘community’.

heidi8:

theorlandojones:

This is a very serious disease* so I gladly accept the “bucket challenge”

*My heart goes out to all those who struggle with ALS but I am, of course, talking about the disease of apathy.  If (and hopefully when) Michael Brown’s killer is brought to justice and convicted of 1st degree murder, it still won’t prevent this from happening again. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We MUST continue the fight at the ballot box, in the media and by working to create systemic change. I’m not naive to the dirty politics (redistricting, voter ID requirements, etc) that will try to prevent us from our goal. But I refuse to give up hope. My “bullet bucket challenge” is not about pointing fingers and it’s not about being angry. Every shell casing in that bucket represents the life of someone who fought and died in the goal for civil rights and human dignity. As a member of law enforcement (yes I really am a reserve sheriff) I will not stand idly by while others violate civil and human rights under the cover of authority and I will insist that other good cops rise to the same standard as well. As a black man I will demand more from myself and my community. I will not allow outsiders to co-opt our struggle in order to commit violence in our name. I’m channeling my outrage into action so I no longer feel powerless. It’s not about black or white. It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious.

"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality"

Join me.

My kids thought they were beads in the bucket, or ball bearings. I explained what they were, and why Orlando was pouring those instead of ice. 

I know the degree of privilege I have - we have - to not know what shell casings are - I’d never seen them myself until I was 14 and paid a visit to a military base - and God willing I hope my kids never see them In Real Life. In this context, they’re something to think about, and they hopefully will spur action. 

Hey, White Americans. We Need to Talk.

trinilikesalt:

postcardsfromspace:

According to a Pew Research survey, only 37% of white Americans think the events in #Ferguson raise important issues about race.

Okay, fellow white people. We need to talk.

Let me tell you a story: I was an angry punk teenager. Not violent, but I did a shitton of…

"So educate yourself, get the tools, and start dismantling this fucker.

Privilege is the bandwidth to speak up and dismantle because you’re not in fear for your life. And there is no conscionable excuse for failing to use it.”

This happenedThis is happening. Not recognizing it; stonewalling and insulating ourselves in our little bubbles does not make it go away.

Ten Things White People Can Do About Ferguson Besides Tweet

Written by Kate Harding
If you feel helpless, there are ways you can channel your rage and sadness in real life.

1. Join a peaceful protest.

They’re happening all around the country tonight, including at the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, around 7 p.m. Eastern. 

2. Recognize that Michael Brown’s death was not an isolated incident.

In 2012, more than 300 black people were executed by police, security guards, or vigilantes. In the last month, three other unarmed African-American men—Eric Garner in New York, John Crawford III in Beavercreek, Ohio, and Ezell Ford in Los Angeles—have been killed by police. Those are the ones we know about.

3. Stop saying “This can’t be happening in America.”

I understand the impulse, I really do. But that impulse only comes to those who are insulated and isolated from how America treats poor people and people of color every day. Langston Hughes wrote “America never was America to me” in 1935. If you didn’t quite understand that poem in your junior high or high-school lit classes, read it again, while you think about what’s happening in Ferguson. Let it sink in.

- See more at: http://damemagazine.com/2014/08/14/ten-things-white-people-can-do-about-ferguson-besides-tweet#sthash.izLANJ6q.WxhhtZAE.dpuf
profkew:

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.
New York’s ‘Night Of Birmingham Horror’ Sparked A Summer Of Riots

It was called “New York’s night of Birmingham horror.”
Just over two weeks after the landmark Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964, violence erupted in the streets of New York City, lasting a total of six nights. It was the first in a series of riots that would come to define the later years of the 1960s civil rights movement. The New York City riot of 1964 electrified the nation and led to splits within the movement’s leadership.
It began outside the walls of a Harlem police station, days after Lt. Thomas Gilligan, a white, off-duty police officer, shot and killed a 15-year-old African-American student named James Powell on July 16. Two days of peaceful protests ensued. But on the third day, a crowd surrounded the police precinct, calling for Gilligan’s arrest, and was met with swinging clubs of the New York Police Department, under a rainfall of glass bottles and garbage can lids thrown by residents from rooftops above. Gunfire broke out after police pushed thousands of demonstrators back a few blocks toward the corner of 125th Street and Lenox Avenue.
Read more here.

profkew:

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.

New York’s ‘Night Of Birmingham Horror’ Sparked A Summer Of Riots

It was called “New York’s night of Birmingham horror.”

Just over two weeks after the landmark Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964, violence erupted in the streets of New York City, lasting a total of six nights. It was the first in a series of riots that would come to define the later years of the 1960s civil rights movement. The New York City riot of 1964 electrified the nation and led to splits within the movement’s leadership.

It began outside the walls of a Harlem police station, days after Lt. Thomas Gilligan, a white, off-duty police officer, shot and killed a 15-year-old African-American student named James Powell on July 16. Two days of peaceful protests ensued. But on the third day, a crowd surrounded the police precinct, calling for Gilligan’s arrest, and was met with swinging clubs of the New York Police Department, under a rainfall of glass bottles and garbage can lids thrown by residents from rooftops above. Gunfire broke out after police pushed thousands of demonstrators back a few blocks toward the corner of 125th Street and Lenox Avenue.

Read more here.