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AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

Triangle Fire

"It was the deadliest workplace accident in New York City’s history. A dropped match on the 8th floor of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory sparked a fire that killed over a hundred innocent people trapped inside. The private industry of the American factory would never be the same." — PBS

A century later, and we’re still fighting for a living wage and decent working conditions. — ADignorantium

asteriskseverywhere:

Find out more about Transgender Day of Remembrance at www.transgenderdor.org

See the list of people who died because of anti-transgender violence in 2012.

My very first friend in the gay community was transgender. I had just come out. She said I looked like I was “delightfully lost” — as in I was having so much fun, that I absolutely did not want to be found. :)

She looked out for me - kept me out of trouble - made sure I didn’t get caught up with the wrong crowd.

The summer after we met, her charred and mutilated corpse was found wrapped in a black plastic trash bag, dumped by the side of I-95. Her’s was one of the many bodies of transgender persons found along the highway that summer. It was a sickening reminder of how much hate there is in our world.

Maybe it’s because of her that I don’t feel the need to judge everything I don’t understand. “Darling!” she used to say, “It’s not your job to understand. It just is.”

She had a way of putting things. Had she lived long enough, she would have laid claim to the phrase, “It is what it is.”

It’s important to remember that transgender folks played a huge part in LGBT history. Though not identified as transgender at the time, trans people made up a fair share of the crowd that fought police at the Stonewall in 1969. That crowd was made up primarily of outcasts; people who had little to lose — among them, drag queens, hustlers, homeless youth and transgender people.

It takes courage to change the world, and who has more courage than those that must defend themselves every single day of their lives? — ADignorantium

(Source: gendersintensify)

Ready, Fire, Aim: The Science Behind Police Shooting Bystanders

A Saturday incident in Times Square showed yet again that even highly trained police are not always accurate marksmen

On Saturday night in New York City’s Times Square, police opened fire on a man who was walking erratically into oncoming traffic and, when approached by law enforcement, reached into his pocket as if he were grabbing a weapon. The officers fired three shots. One hit a 54-year-old woman in the knee and another grazed a 35-year-old woman’s buttocks. None hit the suspect, whom police subsequently subdued with a taser.

While incidents of police shooting bystanders are uncommon, they shouldn’t surprise New Yorkers (or anyone else) when they happen. Just last year, New York police injured nine onlookers in the course of responding to a murder suspect near the Empire State Building. As police chased the man through rush hour crowds, he fired at the cops; they returned 16 shots, hitting the man 10 times. That actually counted as accurate shooting for the NYPD.

According to a 2008 RAND Corporation study evaluating the New York Police Department’s firearm training, between 1998 and 2006, the average hit rate during gunfights was just 18 percent. When suspects did not return fire, police officers hit their targets 30 percent of the time.

The data show what any police officer who has ever been involved in a shooting can tell you–firing accurately in a stressful situation is extremely hard. In an article for TIME last year, Amanda Ripley looked what happens in the brain and body when shots are fired. The brain stem sends out signals that cause blood vessels to constrict and hormones to surge. Studies have shown that eyesight becomes narrower (literally tunnel vision) under such conditions. People who have been in gunfights describe hearing very little and perceieve time slowing down. Amid this chaos, as police officers have to make difficult, split-second decisions, humans can lose motor skills as the body reverts to basic fight or flight instincts.

Overcoming those natural reactions is the goal of rigorous training. Many police departments focus on decision-making as much as marksmanship, helping officers to decide in an instant whether to…


Read more: http://nation.time.com/2013/09/16/ready-fire-aim-the-science-behind-police-shooting-bystanders/#ixzz2f5e4LF4l

paxmachina:

Will incessantly/shamelessly reblog my friend!

I know video on Yumblr is tedious, but please watch this you won’t regret!

I’m mainly a street art and photography curator, and revel in blogging anonymously, yet enjoy the privilege of many tumblr followers (so not worthy of it.) But here is a look into my real life close friend singer/songwriter Nhu An Do!

Nhu An my real life friend and inspiration, who is just purely amazing! 

Pax!

crushcomedy:

I am 3 classes away from completing the Dig Yoga Summer Challenge of 20 yoga classes in 30 days. Anyone who has talked to me in the last four weeks has heard me say the word yoga at least 23 times per conversation. While amid this physical challenge, I have been sourcing yoga in other aspects of life, like comedy. Please watch this video from The Moth storyteller and singer-songwriter Nhu An Do. It’s funny, slightly traumatic, and she might be the first person to have ever performed yoga poses in the middle of telling a story at The Moth! Nhu An and I have never officially met, but we’ve been emailing for a last few months and hopefully she will make it down to Philadelphia for Tell Me A Story at some point! 

Additionally, my favorite Podcast, Professor Blastoff, had an entire episode devoted to Yoga just as I was embarking on my month long intensive. Definitely worth a listen, even if yoga is not your thing. It’s worth hearing Tig Notaro, Kyle Dunnigan, and David Huntsberger chant “OM”. 

Namaste. 

foreverdancingangel:

elhuesudoii:

elpacer:

feferisbueller:

I FINALLY FOUND IT

my life is complete i’ve only seen the last gif i have tears in my eyes i just

why settle for the animated gifs alone

when you can have the whole video

F-CK HE IS EVERYTHING I NEED TO BE IN LIFE

This kid’s parents need to receive the “Best Parents Ever!” Award. :))

You MUST click on the Vimeo link to watch the video and read how this video came to be.

(Source: gerardpumpkinway)

stairway-t0-haven:

mrstandrakshaye:

newfoundseth:

byyourleave:

Don’t ever try to tell me this isn’t art.  This is fucking art.

Damn…..

At very first I like, didn’t understand what he was doing with the palette knife, and then I was like YOU ARE NOT YOU FUCKING FUCK

At first I thought he was just gonna spray a bunch of colors and leave it. But no, that’s cool. :3

…just watch.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 28, 1969: Police Raid the Stonewall Inn
In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. That night, the street erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations that lasted for the next three days.
The Stonewall riots, as they came to be known, marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.
In 2011, American Experience released the film “The Stonewall Uprising.”
Today, on the 44th anniversary, we invite you to:    •    Explore the milestones in the American Gay Rights Movement    •    View photos of the Stonewall Uprising    •    Watch the full film The Stonewall Uprising (Run time: 01:22:03)

Though the Stonewall Riots were pivotal to the advancement of the LGBT movement, I’d like to also acknowledge The Daughters of Bilitis and The Mattachine Society for their hard work and struggle.
Did you know The Daughters of Bilitis is on facebook?

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 28, 1969: Police Raid the Stonewall Inn

In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. That night, the street erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations that lasted for the next three days.

The Stonewall riots, as they came to be known, marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world.

In 2011, American Experience released the film “The Stonewall Uprising.”

Today, on the 44th anniversary, we invite you to:
    •    Explore the milestones in the American Gay Rights Movement
    •    View photos of the Stonewall Uprising
    •    Watch the full film The Stonewall Uprising (Run time: 01:22:03)

Though the Stonewall Riots were pivotal to the advancement of the LGBT movement, I’d like to also acknowledge The Daughters of Bilitis and The Mattachine Society for their hard work and struggle.

Did you know The Daughters of Bilitis is on facebook?