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zonerunners:

hucci-peach:

21 year old transgender female Islan Nettles died after being savagely beaten to death by her attacker Paris Wilson. According to witnesses, Wilson was shouting homophobic and transphobic slurs before being pulled off the victim by police. Wilson only received misdemeanor assault charges that were dropped after only spending 10 hours in jail… Today he is walking free in New York City. He has not been charged with murder. Islan was an aspiring fashion designer who’s dreams were cut short by the same type of hate crimes that have taken the lives of countless other lgbt youth. Spread the word about this injustice and raise awareness about savage hate crimes like this towards lgbt youth. #Regram #Justice4Islan

sources: x x x 

It’s been six months, but I’m reblogging to keep Islan’s name in the public eye.

zonerunners:

hucci-peach:

21 year old transgender female Islan Nettles died after being savagely beaten to death by her attacker Paris Wilson. According to witnesses, Wilson was shouting homophobic and transphobic slurs before being pulled off the victim by police.
Wilson only received misdemeanor assault charges that were dropped after only spending 10 hours in jail… Today he is walking free in New York City. He has not been charged with murder.
Islan was an aspiring fashion designer who’s dreams were cut short by the same type of hate crimes that have taken the lives of countless other lgbt youth.
Spread the word about this injustice and raise awareness about savage hate crimes like this towards lgbt youth.
#Regram #Justice4Islan

sources: x x x 

It’s been six months, but I’m reblogging to keep Islan’s name in the public eye.

leseanthomas:

NYC in the 1980s.

Love.

Memories.


After picking up a camera at the age of 15, Jamel Shabazz has been unknowingly become the first “visual documentarian” of hip hop. For over 30 years he’s captured the world around him. Every frame  of that world is a time portal that sparks emotion stemming from the scenes they represent. And if there is ever a glimpse into the foundations of street wear and its surrounding culture, it can be found in the pages of his first book.

“Back In The Days” is real deal documentation as it pertains to the origins of hip hop, not to mention hip hop fashion. No 2oK a day models. No makeup artists. No food trucks. The models in the book don’t need runways because they lived the life of style. Jamel Shabazz was there to capture it all.”

Purchase here: http://www.jamelshabazz.com/monographs.html

Short shorts, knee high socks, head bands, and giant boom boxes! — All the things I loved/hated about the 80s. NYC was just an hour by train from Philly. Each city had the same grit and graffiti. Maybe I’m remembering it differently, but the people were friendlier too. — or maybe everybody’s friendly when you’re 20.

This is a great collection of some really great photography.

Because October is LGBT History Month, and Saturday (October 11) is National Coming Out Day, I thought I’d share a recent find.
On a recent trip to my favorite Philadelphia used book seller, The Last Word (220 S. 40th St.), I picked up "No Bath But Plenty of Bubbles: an oral history of the Gay Liberation Front 1970-73" by Lisa Power (c)1995
"No Bath But Plenty of Bubbles" features first hand accounts of the GLF, which evolved from other social justice movements of the 1960s, women’s liberation, black panthers, etc.
What makes this such an interesting book is that, while most modern LGBT Historical accounts are Americentric, “No Bath But Plenty of Bubbles” is told primarily from a U.K. perspective. — Yes, there are LGBT people outside of the U.S..
It’s important to know our history. LGBT folks didn’t just appear instantaneously at the Stonewall Inn on a hot summer night in 1969. We’ve been around since the dawn of time.

Because October is LGBT History Month, and Saturday (October 11) is National Coming Out Day, I thought I’d share a recent find.

On a recent trip to my favorite Philadelphia used book seller, The Last Word (220 S. 40th St.), I picked up "No Bath But Plenty of Bubbles: an oral history of the Gay Liberation Front 1970-73" by Lisa Power (c)1995

"No Bath But Plenty of Bubbles" features first hand accounts of the GLF, which evolved from other social justice movements of the 1960s, women’s liberation, black panthers, etc.

What makes this such an interesting book is that, while most modern LGBT Historical accounts are Americentric, “No Bath But Plenty of Bubbles” is told primarily from a U.K. perspective. — Yes, there are LGBT people outside of the U.S..

It’s important to know our history. LGBT folks didn’t just appear instantaneously at the Stonewall Inn on a hot summer night in 1969. We’ve been around since the dawn of time.

nowyoukno:

nowyoukno:

RIP to all the victims of 9/11.

Click Here to see more

9/11 never forget

Also, because no planes flew accross the U.S. for the next few days there were no contrails in the sky to sheild us from the sun. The temerature rose.
Source 1. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/artificial-weather-revealed-post-9-11-flight-groundings
Source 2. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/contrail-effect.html

Three Days Without Contrails

The post-9/11 grounding of all commercial aircraft resulted in the sudden disappearance of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft across the entire United States. According to the Nature study, the potential of contrails “…from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years…,” but it was not until the three-day grounding period that doubts concerning the existence of the phenomenon could be put to rest.   

The Phenomenon: A 1.8 Degree Celsius Increase In Temperature in North America

The study found “…an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001.”

long70s:

STUDIO 54: DIVINE DECADANCE

From 1943 to 1976, the former opera house at 254 W 54Th Street was owned by CBS and used as a production studio for To Tell the Truth, Beat the Clock and Captain Kangaroo. When the network moved to the Ed Sullivan Theatre, they sold the W 54th St building in 1976 to Ian Schrager and Steve Rubell, who had the financial backing of Jack Dushey. In early 1977, Schrager and Rubell converted the the building into a nightclub/disco named for after the location’s previous use and street address. For the opening of Studio 54, a 4” layer of glitter was laid across the floors, which Schrager said was “like standing on stardust.” Weekend DJ Richie Kaczor, usually dressed injeans and t-shirt, manned the turntables; he turned Gloria Gaynor’s 1979 b-side “I Will Survive” into a #1 single by championing the song at Studio 54. The minimally-clad bartenders and busboys ensured many open bar tabs.

The clientele was a blend of A-list celebrities and beautiful, exhibitionist unknowns. The exclusivity of Studio 54 allowed celebrities to let loose without worries and the club quickly became a second home for the likes of Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, Bianca Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Halston, Mick Jagger, Jerry Hall, Debbie Harry, Grace Jones, Michael Jackson, Calvin Klein, Elton John, Tina Turner, Divine, Margaret Trudeau,Sylvia Miles, Francesco Scavullo, Truman Capote, Margaux Hemingway, Janice Dickinson, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Diana Ross, Cher, Salvador Dali, Diana Vreeland, John Travolta, Jacqueline Onassis, Brooke Shields and Martha Graham.

In December 1978, the coke-addled Rubell was quoted in the New York newspapers as saying the Studio 54 had made $7 million in its first year and that “only the Mafia made more money.” Shortly thereafter the nightclub was raided and Rubell and Schrager were arrested and charged with tax evasion; it was later revealed that they had failed to report over $2.5 million in revenue. They were the first people to be convicted of tax evasion for a single year. On 4 February 1980, with a guest list that included  Ryan O’Neal, Mariel Hemingway, Jocelyn Wildenstein, Richard Gere, Gia Carangi, Jack Nicholson, Reggie Jackson, and Sylvester Stallone celebrated their last night before entering prison where they each served 13-months.

Schrager and Rubell sold the building, leased it from the new owners and on 12 September 1981, Studio 54 re-opened with Andy Warhol, Calvin Klein, Cary Grant, Lauren Hutton, Gloria Vanderbilt and Brooke Shields in attendance. Although the club was popular in the early 1980s, the velvet rope policy had to be considerably relaxed, which drove the glamorous and the famous to other venues like Danceteria, Area, The Church and Nell’s.

profkew:

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.
New York’s ‘Night Of Birmingham Horror’ Sparked A Summer Of Riots

It was called “New York’s night of Birmingham horror.”
Just over two weeks after the landmark Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964, violence erupted in the streets of New York City, lasting a total of six nights. It was the first in a series of riots that would come to define the later years of the 1960s civil rights movement. The New York City riot of 1964 electrified the nation and led to splits within the movement’s leadership.
It began outside the walls of a Harlem police station, days after Lt. Thomas Gilligan, a white, off-duty police officer, shot and killed a 15-year-old African-American student named James Powell on July 16. Two days of peaceful protests ensued. But on the third day, a crowd surrounded the police precinct, calling for Gilligan’s arrest, and was met with swinging clubs of the New York Police Department, under a rainfall of glass bottles and garbage can lids thrown by residents from rooftops above. Gunfire broke out after police pushed thousands of demonstrators back a few blocks toward the corner of 125th Street and Lenox Avenue.
Read more here.

profkew:

Helmeted New York City police carry away a rioter at West 130th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem on July 19, 1964.

New York’s ‘Night Of Birmingham Horror’ Sparked A Summer Of Riots

It was called “New York’s night of Birmingham horror.”

Just over two weeks after the landmark Civil Rights Act was signed into law in 1964, violence erupted in the streets of New York City, lasting a total of six nights. It was the first in a series of riots that would come to define the later years of the 1960s civil rights movement. The New York City riot of 1964 electrified the nation and led to splits within the movement’s leadership.

It began outside the walls of a Harlem police station, days after Lt. Thomas Gilligan, a white, off-duty police officer, shot and killed a 15-year-old African-American student named James Powell on July 16. Two days of peaceful protests ensued. But on the third day, a crowd surrounded the police precinct, calling for Gilligan’s arrest, and was met with swinging clubs of the New York Police Department, under a rainfall of glass bottles and garbage can lids thrown by residents from rooftops above. Gunfire broke out after police pushed thousands of demonstrators back a few blocks toward the corner of 125th Street and Lenox Avenue.

Read more here.

Pay It No Mind: Marsha P. Johnson

This feature-length documentary focuses on revolutionary trans-activist, Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson, a Stonewall instigator, Andy Warhol model, drag queen, sex worker, starving actress, and Saint. “Pay It” captures the legendary gay/human rights activist as she recounts her life at the forefront of The Stonewall Riots in the 1960s, the creation of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries) with Sylvia Rivera in the ’70s, and a New York City activist throughout the ’80s and early ’90s. Through her own words, as well as interviews with gay activist/reporter Randy Wicker, former Cockettes performer Agosto Machado, author Michael Musto, Hot Peaches founder/performer, Jimmy Camicia, and Stonewall activists Bob Kohler, Danny Garvin, Tommy Lanigan-Schmidt, and Martin Boyce, Marsha’s story lives on.

This documentary screened in 2012 at the IFC theater in New York, the British Film Institute in London, and La Mutinerie in Paris France.

I met Marsha Johnson in 1985 while visiting New York’s Gay Pride Parade with my first boyfriend. I was just twenty years old, it was my very first Pride celebration, and needless to say, Marsha made an huge impression on me.

I didn’t really know Marsha all that well, but feel fortunate that she and I chanced meeting twice again before she mysteriously died. Her joy for life was contagious.

I believe that people like Marsha, these innocents if you will, are put here to make the world a better place.

Happy Pride Month Everybody!

as posted on ADignorantium.WordPress

peterhujararchive:

Quentin Crisp on the New York Subway by Peter Hujar, 1982

 “The young always have the same problem - how to rebel and conform at the same time. They have now solved this by defying their parents and copying one another.”- QC
 “There is no need to do any housework at all. After the first four years the dirt doesn’t get any worse.”- QC
…and my personal favorite.
"Never keep up with the Joneses. Drag them down to your level. It’s cheaper.”- QC
Quentin Crisp is my hero. :)
#LGBTthrowbackthursday

peterhujararchive:

Quentin Crisp on the New York Subway by Peter Hujar, 1982

“The young always have the same problem - how to rebel and conform at the same time. They have now solved this by defying their parents and copying one another.”- QC

“There is no need to do any housework at all. After the first four years the dirt doesn’t get any worse.”- QC

…and my personal favorite.

"Never keep up with the Joneses. Drag them down to your level. It’s cheaper.”- QC

Quentin Crisp is my hero. :)

#LGBTthrowbackthursday

retrogasm:

The Crisco Twist

What we have here is a pic of the DJ booth at Crisco Disco, a notorious gay dance club located on West 15th st and 10th ave in Manhattan. (New York City’s meatpacking district)
I understand the building is now home to a sophisticated restaurant called Monarch. My have things changed. :P
There was a Crisco Disco album released that wasn’t as successful as the Studio54 album. It’s cover art was more than a little suggestive. If you have it, hold onto it. It’s probably worth a small fortune.
I’m not old enough to have visited Crisco’s, but I had friends who lovingly spoke of it and various other haunts. This image reminded me of them. :)

PS: I’m adding the following comment from VanishingNewYork because it captures the dissatisfaction I sometimes feel with the whitewashing of our cities’ nightlife. (I say ‘cities’ because it’s happening everywhere.)
Anonymous said… The city was once “open” and a lot more fun. Whether you are gay or not, the point is that in those days (everything prior to the mid-late 90’s) the city was more liberal. Now, everything is pretty much “sterilized” and totally boring. The clubs in those days had a cast of characters from the NYC of yesteryear. You had all classes of people (working class and blue collar to street types, to affluent) all mixing together for the sake of good times. I feel like when I go to a club (today) it’s like nobody is having fun…. (source)

retrogasm:

The Crisco Twist

What we have here is a pic of the DJ booth at Crisco Disco, a notorious gay dance club located on West 15th st and 10th ave in Manhattan. (New York City’s meatpacking district)

I understand the building is now home to a sophisticated restaurant called Monarch. My have things changed. :P

There was a Crisco Disco album released that wasn’t as successful as the Studio54 album. It’s cover art was more than a little suggestive. If you have it, hold onto it. It’s probably worth a small fortune.

I’m not old enough to have visited Crisco’s, but I had friends who lovingly spoke of it and various other haunts. This image reminded me of them. :)

PS: I’m adding the following comment from VanishingNewYork because it captures the dissatisfaction I sometimes feel with the whitewashing of our cities’ nightlife. (I say ‘cities’ because it’s happening everywhere.)

  • Anonymous said… The city was once “open” and a lot more fun. Whether you are gay or not, the point is that in those days (everything prior to the mid-late 90’s) the city was more liberal. Now, everything is pretty much “sterilized” and totally boring. The clubs in those days had a cast of characters from the NYC of yesteryear. You had all classes of people (working class and blue collar to street types, to affluent) all mixing together for the sake of good times. I feel like when I go to a club (today) it’s like nobody is having fun…. (source)

cognitivedissonance:

superlolita:

il-tenore-regina:

shakeshack:

Artist Nathan Pyle's gif guide to NYC street etiquette is handy for any city. Take it to the streets!

I love this.

PHILLY TOO!

EVERYWHERE, Get Out Of The Way, Damn It!!

AND… There’s a special place in hell for people who stop for any reason at the top of an escalator!