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jean-prouvairy:

year-0f-the-kyle:

It never has.

This is a concept most of tumblr can’t wrap their head around.

THANK YOU

Agreed! But…

People who are discriminated against have a right to be angry. The trick is using that anger productively.

Education is the best weapon against *isms and *phobias.

As I’ve said before, I’ve occasionally been the bonehead. If it wasn’t for some very patient friends who took the time to explain to me that what I was saying or doing was hurting them, I might never have grown as a human. So, while I agree 100% that hate does not end hate, I will not criticize those who have been wronged for expressing their anger.

Now back to cute kitten GIFs. ;)

(Source: )

South African Comedian Trevor Noah

Trevor Noah talks about apartheid, interracial marriage, and coming to America.

and he does it in a really funny way! :))

Reverse-Ranting

icantbelieveitsnotbuddha:

Reverse-sexism isn’t a thing, people. Neither is reverse-racism. Reverse-sexism would be gender-equality. Reverse-racism would be racial-equality. I get the point people are trying to make, but to me it seems to downplay the fact that if someone from a “minority” prejudges someone based on the colour of their skin or the particular plumbing they were born with, that it somehow isn’t racism or sexism.

Keep in mind, this isn’t a typical white male who feels put-upon when criticized. It truly bothers me that reverse-racism and -sexism (maybe we should call them “revenge-racism and revenge-sexism”, or more appropriately, “racism” and “sexism”) are given a pass in society. “It’s okay. They’ve been the subject of prejudice all their lives. They’re allowed to do exactly the same thing that was done to them.”

How can anyone heal from the damage of oppression if, after the oppression is largely lifted (note, I said “largely lifted”; there are certainly still changes to be made) they are given the green-light to retaliate against their oppressors in exactly the same way (i.e., by making prejudgments based on nothing more than physical characteristics)?

Revenge is never a solution to a problem, especially if after the revenge you still have to live in a society with the target.

Have white males behaved badly throughout history? Absolutely. I think most people would agree that they have. Does it help when the victim does the exact same thing? No. Eventually, someone has to forgive or we get nowhere.

I agree. The problem with “revenge” racism or “revenge” sexism is that it targets those who may have had little or nothing to do with your oppression. It’s like keeping the entire class after school because one kid was an ass. As a gay man, it would certainly be understandable for me to trash every heterosexual I ever saw, but it would be counterproductive.

That being said, allow me to share a few thoughts.

First, ask yourself if perhaps the person mistreating you is having a bad day. It’s not always about racism or sexism, unless of course epithets are being tossed your way.

Second, when a woman or a person of color directs their anger in my direction, especially online, I don’t take it personally. If I know deep in my heart that I have done nothing to deserve such treatment, I ignore it. They don’t know me. There’s no amount of arguing that will change their mind. Besides, arguing may in fact make it worse. When it happens in person, the only thing you can do is try not to overreact. — We all live in our own realities. When people doubt the intelligence of a Latino who speaks little English, you can hardly blame him for his resentment.

It’s not right to lash out at white males just because they’re white and male, but there is a little thing called “White Male Privilege”. White males can walk down a street in the middle of the night without fear of rape. White males are less likely to be carded at a bar. White males can walk through a department store without being followed or shot by security. I can’t change the fact that I am a white male, but I can be aware of how I affect the world around me. Perhaps if more of us were a little more aware, there might be less distrust of white men.

And yes, if you treat a white person badly simply because (s)he is white, are you any better than any other bigot?

…but what do I know?

idling-in-the-breakdown-lane:

thatfriendlyblackguy:

cartelcoco:

bana05:

thehuskybro:

Brother broke it down in two minutes and some change, especially on that “Honorary Blackness” bullshit and the Negroes in that locker room that had Incognito’s back

Tell it.

I felt this in my BONES. Yall “Hood pass” givin negroes need to watch this and feel ashamed.

Man…Shannon can tell it.

Dude is emotional.  and rightly so.

Dear white people, if you know something is offensive, why do it? If you’re not sure, don’t do it.

We have to stop with the excuses. Stop pointing the finger. It’s not about the words that “they” use. It’s about US! It’s about “our” choices.

Even in jest, I never called a friend the big six letter no no. Why would I treat a friend that way?

It’s true I don’t know much about hazing, but I do know there’s an unwritten line that should probably not be crossed. So why do it? It doesn’t make you more of a man. It demonstrates your stupidity!


How a grandmom became a face of HIV in Phi­l­ly’s Latino community

By Samantha Melamed
In March 2002, Nancy Santiago learned she was HIV positive. That July, she tried to take her own life. But by December, she was being featured in the Inquirer as an example of the growing number of Latinas being infected with the virus.

Today, Santiago, 55, has spent a full decade telling her story as the face of HIV in Hispanic Philadelphia. “Wherever they need a voice and a face for the Latino community, I’m out there. I don’t care who knows that I have it. I have it under control; it does not control my life. And HIV is not me,” she says. “I’m a mother of five and a grandmother of 10, and I’m a Latino woman — and I’m HIV positive.”

Last Wednesday, Santiago was sharing that message on Lehigh Avenue outside Prevention Point, the public-health organization and needle-exchange provider where she works as a cleaning lady.


There, she was promoting her latest HIV/AIDS awareness endeavor: She’s one of five local people being featured in Positivo, a first-of-its-kind traditional- and social-media campaign run by the social-justice nonprofit Galaei. The campaign sets out to recast what it means to be Latino and HIV positive or gay in North Philadelphia.

Elicia Gonzales, Galaei’s executive director, says the idea was born after Galaei conducted a survey of North Philly Latinos, and found that most people “are affirming of gay Latinos and also of HIV-positive people.” But at the same time, they found, “There’s this myth out there that Latinos are homophobic, and that there’s still a lot of stigma around HIV in the Latino community.”

So, they decided to reclaim the term “positivo” or positive, says Louie Ortiz, who helped develop the campaign, which includes a series of postcards, posters and T-shirts featuring local people who are gay and straight, HIV positive and negative. “When people see the ‘positive’ symbol, they tend to think HIV, and then death,” Ortiz says. “I thought, if we can reappropriate and attach new meanings to it, then when people see that sign and see the word positive, they can approach it from a place that’s more loving.”

Galaei is releasing a new postcard each week through Oct. 12, which is National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. Each includes a black-and-white portrait by Ortiz and a unique “positive” message. Santiago’s reads: “I am positive that caring for my family means knowing my status.”

The final postcard will feature Ortiz himself. He was “adamant” at first that he would not be featured in the campaign — but, it turns out, there just aren’t that many Nancy Santiagos out there. Many of the people Ortiz approached for the campaign declined to participate, or backed out at the last minute.

“Being a brown gay man, I’m always living in the stereotype that I am [HIV] positive, or that being positive is only a gay man’s issue,” Ortiz says. “So it was difficult to get young, gay men to be a face of [this campaign]. It wasn’t just a one-time thing. It’s going to be hanging up. It’s going to be on social media. Your friends, your family may have conversations around it.” To his relief, the feedback has been positive; friends and family told him the campaign was long overdue.

As for Santiago, this is well-worn territory. She says she can’t even count how many times she’s told her story. First, back in 2002, she told her children: Her daughters cried. One ran to the trash can and vomited. Her son punched a hole in the wall.

Then, before that first Inquirer article came out, she told each of her co-workers, one by one. She’s told reporters for the Al Día and El Sol newspapers. She’s told school assemblies and audiences at City Hall. She told the world in a 2003 ad campaign for the Philadelphia AIDS Consortium (TPAC).

“It’s nothing to be ashamed of, in my opinion. I can imagine how many people might think, ‘Did she get it because she was using drugs? Or did she get it because she was out in the street, doing unprotected sex?’” she says. “I’m not down on nobody, but that’s not how I got it. I fell in love and trusted the wrong the person, and this person had AIDS. I say, ‘What do you think — grandmoms don’t get AIDS?’”

She says the stigma of HIV is still out there, especially among…
Read the rest of the story at CityPaper.net

How a grandmom became a face of HIV in Phi­l­ly’s Latino community

By Samantha Melamed

In March 2002, Nancy Santiago learned she was HIV positive. That July, she tried to take her own life. But by December, she was being featured in the Inquirer as an example of the growing number of Latinas being infected with the virus.

Today, Santiago, 55, has spent a full decade telling her story as the face of HIV in Hispanic Philadelphia. “Wherever they need a voice and a face for the Latino community, I’m out there. I don’t care who knows that I have it. I have it under control; it does not control my life. And HIV is not me,” she says. “I’m a mother of five and a grandmother of 10, and I’m a Latino woman — and I’m HIV positive.”

Last Wednesday, Santiago was sharing that message on Lehigh Avenue outside Prevention Point, the public-health organization and needle-exchange provider where she works as a cleaning lady.

There, she was promoting her latest HIV/AIDS awareness endeavor: She’s one of five local people being featured in Positivo, a first-of-its-kind traditional- and social-media campaign run by the social-justice nonprofit Galaei. The campaign sets out to recast what it means to be Latino and HIV positive or gay in North Philadelphia.

Elicia Gonzales, Galaei’s executive director, says the idea was born after Galaei conducted a survey of North Philly Latinos, and found that most people “are affirming of gay Latinos and also of HIV-positive people.” But at the same time, they found, “There’s this myth out there that Latinos are homophobic, and that there’s still a lot of stigma around HIV in the Latino community.”

So, they decided to reclaim the term “positivo” or positive, says Louie Ortiz, who helped develop the campaign, which includes a series of postcards, posters and T-shirts featuring local people who are gay and straight, HIV positive and negative. “When people see the ‘positive’ symbol, they tend to think HIV, and then death,” Ortiz says. “I thought, if we can reappropriate and attach new meanings to it, then when people see that sign and see the word positive, they can approach it from a place that’s more loving.”

Galaei is releasing a new postcard each week through Oct. 12, which is National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. Each includes a black-and-white portrait by Ortiz and a unique “positive” message. Santiago’s reads: “I am positive that caring for my family means knowing my status.”

The final postcard will feature Ortiz himself. He was “adamant” at first that he would not be featured in the campaign — but, it turns out, there just aren’t that many Nancy Santiagos out there. Many of the people Ortiz approached for the campaign declined to participate, or backed out at the last minute.

“Being a brown gay man, I’m always living in the stereotype that I am [HIV] positive, or that being positive is only a gay man’s issue,” Ortiz says. “So it was difficult to get young, gay men to be a face of [this campaign]. It wasn’t just a one-time thing. It’s going to be hanging up. It’s going to be on social media. Your friends, your family may have conversations around it.” To his relief, the feedback has been positive; friends and family told him the campaign was long overdue.

As for Santiago, this is well-worn territory. She says she can’t even count how many times she’s told her story. First, back in 2002, she told her children: Her daughters cried. One ran to the trash can and vomited. Her son punched a hole in the wall.

Then, before that first Inquirer article came out, she told each of her co-workers, one by one. She’s told reporters for the Al Día and El Sol newspapers. She’s told school assemblies and audiences at City Hall. She told the world in a 2003 ad campaign for the Philadelphia AIDS Consortium (TPAC).

“It’s nothing to be ashamed of, in my opinion. I can imagine how many people might think, ‘Did she get it because she was using drugs? Or did she get it because she was out in the street, doing unprotected sex?’” she says. “I’m not down on nobody, but that’s not how I got it. I fell in love and trusted the wrong the person, and this person had AIDS. I say, ‘What do you think — grandmoms don’t get AIDS?’”

She says the stigma of HIV is still out there, especially among…

Read the rest of the story at CityPaper.net

laughingsquid:

Pranksters Sweep Strangers Off Their Feet & Greet Them With a Kiss

Now class… Can anyone tell me what’s wrong with this video?

…Anyone?

Aside from the apparent fact that these college kids probably all know one another, this video perpetuates the idea that men can just grab whichever woman he wants.

One guy passes one of the young women to his friend. The message is clear.

And finally, they tell you to check out the video of them kissing random girls.

  • Let me now throw another wrench into the system…

When one of the guys attempts to pick up another guy, his friend says, “That’s weird, dude.” Well, if you find it weird, why do it? - Can you say “Homophobia”?

I’m sure these two gentlemen are perfectly nice guys, but they’re acting like boneheads. They’ve probably been told all their lives that they’re cute/handsome/sexy whatever, and think they are desirable enough to grab/touch anyone they want. Now suppose if a couple of Latinos tried this. How about two Black men?

Or… What if the men who made this video weren’t as acceptably good looking as these two?

Just askin’.

t-funster:

"Well, when I was nine years old, Star Trek came on, I looked at it and I went screaming through the house, 'Come here, mum, everybody, come quick, come quick, there's a black lady on television and she ain't no maid!' I knew right then and there I could be anything I wanted to be.”— Whoopi Goldberg

…nuff said.

t-funster:

"Well, when I was nine years old, Star Trek came on, I looked at it and I went screaming through the house, 'Come here, mum, everybody, come quick, come quick, there's a black lady on television and she ain't no maid!' I knew right then and there I could be anything I wanted to be.”

Whoopi Goldberg

…nuff said.

The Geography of U.S. Hate, Mapped Using Twitter

By Matt Peckham of Time.com
Skim the zoomed-out surface of Humboldt State University’s alarming “Hate Map” and you’ll encounter angry clouds of bright red framed by smears of gloomy blue, as if some giant freak storm were raining down hell across the the United States.
(MORE: Star Wars and Doctor Who Fans Clash at Sci-Fi Convention)
What you’re looking at is actually a map created by pairing Google‘s Maps API with a hailstorm of homophobic, racist and other prejudicial tweets. It’s part of a project overseen by Humboldt State University professor Dr. Monica Stephens, who, along with a team of undergraduate researchers, wanted to test for geographic relationships to hate speech.
Above the map, the words “homophobic,” “racist” and “disability” define alternate “hate storm” views, each describing a range of highly offensive terms. Click on the keywords or any of their subcategories and the map shifts, the splotches reorganizing to reflect occurrences of the selected term: Bright red areas describe the “most hate,” while light blue ones describe “some hate.”
Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/05/20/the-geography-of-u-s-hate-mapped-using-twitter/#ixzz2TrEAnER9

View the Interactive U.S. "Hate Map"

The Geography of U.S. Hate, Mapped Using Twitter

Skim the zoomed-out surface of Humboldt State University’s alarming “Hate Map” and you’ll encounter angry clouds of bright red framed by smears of gloomy blue, as if some giant freak storm were raining down hell across the the United States.

(MORE: Star Wars and Doctor Who Fans Clash at Sci-Fi Convention)

What you’re looking at is actually a map created by pairing Google‘s Maps API with a hailstorm of homophobic, racist and other prejudicial tweets. It’s part of a project overseen by Humboldt State University professor Dr. Monica Stephens, who, along with a team of undergraduate researchers, wanted to test for geographic relationships to hate speech.

Above the map, the words “homophobic,” “racist” and “disability” define alternate “hate storm” views, each describing a range of highly offensive terms. Click on the keywords or any of their subcategories and the map shifts, the splotches reorganizing to reflect occurrences of the selected term: Bright red areas describe the “most hate,” while light blue ones describe “some hate.”

The Legacy of Dr. King and Our Struggle to End AIDS


January 17th, 2013 by

This Monday, as the nation commemorates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., President Barack Obama will also be sworn in for his second term as President of the United States. The historic significance of this event cannot be overstated, and for those of us who have dedicated our lives to realizing Dr. King’s vision of not just racial equality, but social justice, Monday will mark the culmination of decades of struggle. But with each success, we are reminded that our nation’s march toward equality is never complete. It is a constant evolution of hearts and minds, policy and tradition. Thanks to the work of Dr. King and so many others, our nation’s made incredible progress, but substantial work remains.

The fight against HIV/AIDS has always been about more than the search for medicine or a cure. It has been a battle for human dignity. To demonstrate that each life, regardless of race, sexual orientation, gender identity, nation of origin, or religion, has inherent value. From the beginning, this epidemic has taken the largest toll on our most marginalized communities. From gay men and transgender women, to injection drug users and people of color, those who are most often shut out of our nation’s halls of affluence and power are also the most vulnerable to a whole host of health challenges, including HIV.

Over the last four years, we’ve made huge strides in leveling the playing field…

Read more… http://nmac.org/ending-the-epidemic/the-legacy-of-dr-king-and-our-struggle-to-end-aids/

Paul Kawata
Executive Director
National Minority AIDS Council