We're not here right now. But if you leave a message with your name, number and time you called...

 

secularhumanist2:

natskep:
if you need a reward/punishment system to tell you right from wrong, kiss your dog, because you are no better than him

Every dog owner will tell you that even dogs know right from wrong.

secularhumanist2:

natskep:

if you need a reward/punishment system to tell you right from wrong, kiss your dog, because you are no better than him

Every dog owner will tell you that even dogs know right from wrong.

669 Jewish Children Were Saved From The Holocaust By A Single Man. This Is How They Thanked Him.

via Upworthy.com

Sir Nicholas Winton who organized the rescue and passage to Britain of about 669 mostly Jewish Czechoslovakian children destined for the Nazi death camps before World War II in an operation known as the Czech Kindertransport. This video is the BBC Programme “That’s Life” aired in 1988.

Special thanks to

thetallblacknerd:

mediaite:

Imagine A World Without Hate

Wow this hurts

Oh… my God. Mathew Shepard. So sad.

I will never, never forget where I was when I first heard of his brutal murder, and how I felt… still feel. The details of his beaten, mangled body tied to a fence, then left to die. It still brings a tear to my eye.

The Legacy of Dr. King and Our Struggle to End AIDS


January 17th, 2013 by

This Monday, as the nation commemorates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., President Barack Obama will also be sworn in for his second term as President of the United States. The historic significance of this event cannot be overstated, and for those of us who have dedicated our lives to realizing Dr. King’s vision of not just racial equality, but social justice, Monday will mark the culmination of decades of struggle. But with each success, we are reminded that our nation’s march toward equality is never complete. It is a constant evolution of hearts and minds, policy and tradition. Thanks to the work of Dr. King and so many others, our nation’s made incredible progress, but substantial work remains.

The fight against HIV/AIDS has always been about more than the search for medicine or a cure. It has been a battle for human dignity. To demonstrate that each life, regardless of race, sexual orientation, gender identity, nation of origin, or religion, has inherent value. From the beginning, this epidemic has taken the largest toll on our most marginalized communities. From gay men and transgender women, to injection drug users and people of color, those who are most often shut out of our nation’s halls of affluence and power are also the most vulnerable to a whole host of health challenges, including HIV.

Over the last four years, we’ve made huge strides in leveling the playing field…

Read more… http://nmac.org/ending-the-epidemic/the-legacy-of-dr-king-and-our-struggle-to-end-aids/

Paul Kawata
Executive Director
National Minority AIDS Council