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Jumpin Jive - Cab Calloway and the Nicholas Brothers

From the movie “Stormy Weather" (1943) which also stars Lena Horne.

For all you young folks, Cab Calloway was the Jay Z of his time. ;)

note: I’m tagging this “Black History” because we often forget how important entertainment and popular culture is in bringing people together and changing the world. These talented people, Cab Calloway, Lena Horne, the Nicholas Brothers, and others like them didn’t have it easy. Even though they were headliners, they still were refused entry into most hotels because of the color of their skin.

Zennie62 On Tumblr: Cory Booker Tweets With Stripper Lynsie Lee To Escape "Gay" Tag

zennie62:

http://www.zennie62blog.com/2013/10/02/cory-booker-tweets-with-stripper-lynsie-lee-to-escape-gay-tag-30405/

Cory Booker Tweets With Stripper Lynsie Lee To Escape “Gay” Tag

image

cory booker1 Cory Booker Tweets With Stripper Lynsie Lee To Escape Gay Tag

Cory Booker And Lynsie Lee

Cory Booker tweeted with a stripper for a politically calculated reason.

Cory Booker’s got a gay problem that some in his camp think is a kind of weight around his campaign for Senate. And no, it’s not making the ones concerned happy. It’s not that they have anything against any homosexual in politics, and many of the people I’m blogging about openly backed Tammy Baldwin’s run to become the first openly Lesbian Senator in U.S. History (me too), but what concerns them is that Booker’s being defined by others and by the Internet, and not by himself.

To fully understand my reply, please read the  Zennie62 tumblr post
 

“If Cory Booker wants to reach Barack Obama’s level, …he’s got to sort out this girlfriend problem.” - Zennie62 

Ummm. No.
Why can’t Cory Booker be the upstanding citizen that he is? Was his heroic compassion for residents of Newark during superstorm Sandy not enough?
Why must a black man prove his manliness?
I realize, as a white man, I’m probably speaking out of turn here. But how are we to get past these stupid preconceived notions of masculinity if someone doesn’t go first?
Mr Booker is a good man. He deserves to be elected senator because he’d be a great advocate for the people.

And finally, the reason for my reaction…

Zennie62 said, in part “…any woman who openly supports him wants to see that he’s at least able to be with someone like her.”

What?

First. For a male to assume to know what a woman thinks is presumptuous at best.
Second - If you’re voting for someone because you feel (s)he looks like someone you could be with, you’re voting for the wrong reasons.

PS: I follow Zennie62 on twitter, youtube, and tumblr. His views are always enlightening. I personally disagree with him on this one issue, but I encourage everyone to check him out..

Baltimore Student Brings Down The House with This Amazing Speech


A summer intern at Teach For America Baltimore, Elijah Miles delivered this inspiring speech to a group of incoming teachers at institute. Wise well beyond his years, we think Elijah’s words are a great reminder about why we do the work that we do.

Elijah will begin college at Morgan State in the fall.

To learn more about Teach For America, visit: http://www.teachforamerica.org/

—————————————————————————————————————-

This video was posted on TheGrio.com this morning. It moved me enough to share.

"“Much like Martin Luther King, this is my dream for Baltimore city,” says Miles, a summer intern for Teach For America Baltimore who is bound for Morgan State University this fall.”

Read the accompanying article at The Grio

Bayard Rustin honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

gaywrites:

Bayard Rustin, who was an openly gay advisor to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was announced as a posthumous recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom last week. Also announced as a recipient was the late Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, who was also openly gay.

Bayard Rustin, the openly gay right-hand man to the legendary Dr. King, has been called the “lost prophet” of the Civil Rights Movement. The late Rustin organized demonstrations, rallied activists, and lobbied politicians to help make life better for people of color. He was a key organizer in the historic March on Washington in 1963, where Dr. King delivered his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. Rustin died in 1987.

Rustin will be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the highest civilian honor available — as the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington nears, notes the Human Rights Campaign, which lobbied for Rustin’s inclusion. 

Like Harvey Milk and so many others, Bayard Rustin is one of those people we should be teaching our kids about during civil rights history lessons in schools. Here’s hoping this is the start of some well-deserved recognition across the board. 

fuckyeahwomenprotesting:

Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible pt. 1

It’s important for white folks to watch this video.

Don’t worry. It doesn’t vilify white people. It doesn’t place blame. It does however, lay it all out there in an honest way.

My favorite exchange…

"How can I help promote change and equality for African Americans and ALL people of color?"

"Educate your own people."

(Source: gynocraticgrrl)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 2, 1924: James Baldwin is Born
On this day in 1924, James Baldwin was born in New York City. Baldwin was an iconic American essayist, playwright, and novelist.  His 1953 novel Go Tell It on the Mountain was highly acclaimed for his insights on race, spirituality, and humanity. Baldwin’s other notable novels include Giovanni’s Room, Another Country, Just Above My Head,  and the essay The Fire Next Time.
Baldwin is considered one of the 20th century’s greatest writers because of his exploration of racial and social issues through his work. Baldwin died on December 1, 1987, at his home in St. Paul de Vence, France. 
Watch the archival film "Take This Hammer" to learn more about James Baldwin’s life as an activist and author in the 1960s.
Photo: James Baldwin, 1969. (Wiki Commons)

Please, click the link, learn about my idol, Mr. James Baldwin.
Happy Birthday Mr B! Thank you for enriching our lives.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 2, 1924: James Baldwin is Born

On this day in 1924, James Baldwin was born in New York City. Baldwin was an iconic American essayist, playwright, and novelist.  His 1953 novel Go Tell It on the Mountain was highly acclaimed for his insights on race, spirituality, and humanity. Baldwin’s other notable novels include Giovanni’s Room, Another Country, Just Above My Head,  and the essay The Fire Next Time.

Baldwin is considered one of the 20th century’s greatest writers because of his exploration of racial and social issues through his work. Baldwin died on December 1, 1987, at his home in St. Paul de Vence, France. 

Watch the archival film "Take This Hammer" to learn more about James Baldwin’s life as an activist and author in the 1960s.

Photo: James Baldwin, 1969. (Wiki Commons)

Please, click the link, learn about my idol, Mr. James Baldwin.

Happy Birthday Mr B! Thank you for enriching our lives.

Black Does Not Equal Fear - by Chris Beasley

Published on Jul 20, 2013

This video is about changing the mindset of America. Black does not equal fear. In this video I ask “I am black, do you fear me?” to inspire people to realize their own possible bias. I reference President Obama and many things from the Zimmerman trial. Videographer : Javier Ruiz Music: prod. D.O.P.E.


Transcript

I AM BLACK
DO YOU FEAR ME?
IS IT FROM WHAT YOUVE HEARD
OR WHAT YOU SEE?
I WEAR SWEAT SHIRTS, POLOS, AND WHITE T’S
BUT ITS NOT MY CLOTHeS THAT INDICT ME
Its not my actions, education, or personality
Its my nose, my lips and my ancestry

Why does my skin speak louder than the words I say
We don’t assume all whites are Timothy McVeigh
If I plead the fifth and don’t ad to my case
I can’t escape your ideas of my race

Its ok to infer, conclude, perceive
As long as we know, what we deduct can deceive
Admit you could be wrong 
Cause you don’t know me
thats all that I ask, I’m begging you please

If I have a ball you  clap and cheer
But outside the game you quiver in fear
I see purses clutched closer, doors locked as i pass
Words laced with curses, no wonder we clash

Justice in court
Will always fall short 
If we don’t begin to take a fresh start
The judge tried to excluded race thats a fact
But the jury can’t forget that Trayvon was back
No need to see race and then pick us apart
Cause we all look the same when we stand in the dark
Now judge me simply by my diction
hear my emotion pain and conviction

I want to enlighten not divide
I want respect for your life and mine

If fear is the cause thats something we share
And fear is caused from not knowing whats there

So like President Obama let me be clear
Im a black man 
And I’m not going anywhere

Im part of some gangs you’ve heard all about
I’m an Aggie alum
And a proud Eagle Scout

Entrepreneur starting a career
I will identify my self so you’ll have nothing to fear




The idea of being black has been twisted so much
Were said to be savage , ratchet ghetto, 
Threatening, lazy, and sit on our butts
And those that know me still seem to judge
You call me white cause I’m non of the above
I’ve been called black, and I’ve been called white
Based on what you believe  neither is right
I am Chris one of a kind
So don’t judge me by your experiences but by mine
And I’m incline to tell you, I’m not alone
In moments like this we all can be strong
Let our voices be heard let them relish the sound
How can we move forward if we all stand our ground
And after that verdict, the value of my life seemed bleak
What are my chances if they demonize me
We fear for our lives, to a certain extent
But this video is our self defense.

This video was included in The Obama Diary Wordpress post entitled This And That.
Thank you to @TheObamaDiary for sharing Mr. Beasley’s incredibly powerful and beautiful words.

James Baldwin: excerpts from the KQED documentary “Take This Hammer”

Yes, we have come a long way. A very long way. But after watching the documentary, you might be surprised at how much has remained the same.

Just because we elected a Black President doesn’t mean we are a “Post Racist” America.

The following excerpts are from “James Baldwin: Who Is The N*gger”  by which appeared on AmericaBlog.com (7/15/2013)

“What you say about somebody else, anybody else, reveals you. What I think of you as being.  It’s dictated by my own necessity, my own psychology, my own fears and desires. I’m not describing you when I talk about you, I’m describing me.”

Read More at ADignorantium.Wordpress

The Geography of U.S. Hate, Mapped Using Twitter

By Matt Peckham of Time.com
Skim the zoomed-out surface of Humboldt State University’s alarming “Hate Map” and you’ll encounter angry clouds of bright red framed by smears of gloomy blue, as if some giant freak storm were raining down hell across the the United States.
(MORE: Star Wars and Doctor Who Fans Clash at Sci-Fi Convention)
What you’re looking at is actually a map created by pairing Google‘s Maps API with a hailstorm of homophobic, racist and other prejudicial tweets. It’s part of a project overseen by Humboldt State University professor Dr. Monica Stephens, who, along with a team of undergraduate researchers, wanted to test for geographic relationships to hate speech.
Above the map, the words “homophobic,” “racist” and “disability” define alternate “hate storm” views, each describing a range of highly offensive terms. Click on the keywords or any of their subcategories and the map shifts, the splotches reorganizing to reflect occurrences of the selected term: Bright red areas describe the “most hate,” while light blue ones describe “some hate.”
Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/05/20/the-geography-of-u-s-hate-mapped-using-twitter/#ixzz2TrEAnER9

View the Interactive U.S. "Hate Map"

The Geography of U.S. Hate, Mapped Using Twitter

Skim the zoomed-out surface of Humboldt State University’s alarming “Hate Map” and you’ll encounter angry clouds of bright red framed by smears of gloomy blue, as if some giant freak storm were raining down hell across the the United States.

(MORE: Star Wars and Doctor Who Fans Clash at Sci-Fi Convention)

What you’re looking at is actually a map created by pairing Google‘s Maps API with a hailstorm of homophobic, racist and other prejudicial tweets. It’s part of a project overseen by Humboldt State University professor Dr. Monica Stephens, who, along with a team of undergraduate researchers, wanted to test for geographic relationships to hate speech.

Above the map, the words “homophobic,” “racist” and “disability” define alternate “hate storm” views, each describing a range of highly offensive terms. Click on the keywords or any of their subcategories and the map shifts, the splotches reorganizing to reflect occurrences of the selected term: Bright red areas describe the “most hate,” while light blue ones describe “some hate.”

"The Racist Attack On Charles Ramsey - Amanda Berry Rescuer"

Video by Zennie Abraham - @Zennie62

Though I wouldn’t call them attacks, I have noticed a general racist bend to the reporting of Mr Ramsey; the man who responded to Amanda Berry’s calls for help.

Lets get one thing clear. At a time when most of us ignore the suffering around us, Charles Ramsey acted. In my book, that makes him a hero. If nothing else, he deserves respect for that. His past, his appearance, his education, and the vernacular he uses do not take away from the fact that this man acted when many of us might have just kept walking.

Mr Ramsey is a hero, and should be treated as such.